Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, and cognitive function in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

Shari R. Waldstein, Carrington Rice Wendell, Stephen L. Seliger, Luigi Ferrucci, E. Jeffrey Metter, Alan B. Zonderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the relations between the use of nonaspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin and age-related change in multiple domains of cognitive function in community-dwelling individuals without dementia. Design: Longitudinal, with measures obtained on one to 18 occasions over up to 45 years. Setting: General community. Participants: A volunteer sample of up to 2,300 participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging free of diagnosed dementia. Measurements: At each visit, reported NSAID or aspirin use (yes/no) and tests of verbal and visual memory, attention, perceptuo-motor speed, confrontation naming, executive function, and mental status. Results: Mixed-effects regression models revealed that NSAID use was associated with less prospective decline on the Blessed Information-Memory- Concentration (I-M-C) Test, a mental status test weighted for memory and concentration (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-43
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aspirin
  • Cognitive function
  • Neuropsychology
  • Nsaids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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