Nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures in large, hang-back medial rectus muscle recessions

Ahmed Awadein, Justin D. Marsh, David Lee Guyton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose To investigate the value of nonabsorbable sutures in reducing the incidence of consecutive exotropia after large, "hang-back" medial rectus recessions. Methods The medical records of patients who underwent medial rectus recession of ≥6.5 mm in individuals ≤2 years of age, or ≥7.0 mm in those >2 years were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups based on suture material used: absorbable, polyglactin 910 sutures (44 patients); nonabsorbable, polyester sutures (50 patients). Preoperative measurements, ductions, strabismus surgery, and postoperative results were analyzed. Inadequate anchoring of the medial rectus muscle was suspected when consecutive exotropia developed 4-7 weeks after surgery after initial satisfactory alignment and was confirmed if during reoperation the medial rectus muscle appeared recessed >2 mm beyond the originally intended recession. Results Consecutive exotropia due to inadequate anchoring of the medial rectus muscle occurred in 11 of 66 muscles (17%) in the absorbable suture group. The muscle was found 6-10 mm posterior to the intended recession. Limited duction in the field of action of the involved medial rectus muscle occurred in 9 of the 11 muscles (82%). None of the eyes with nonabsorbable sutures showed inadequate anchoring. The incidence of consecutive exotropia was higher in the absorbable suture group (30%) than in the nonabsorbable suture group (6%) (P <0.005). Conclusions Using nonabsorbable suture for large, hang-back medial rectus recessions greatly reduces the incidence of consecutive exotropia that can occur when absorbable suture dissolves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-209
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Sutures
Exotropia
Muscles
Incidence
Polyglactin 910
Polyesters
Strabismus
Reoperation
Medical Records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures in large, hang-back medial rectus muscle recessions. / Awadein, Ahmed; Marsh, Justin D.; Guyton, David Lee.

In: Journal of AAPOS, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.06.2016, p. 206-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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