Non-dopaminergic treatment of cognitive impairment and dementia in Parkinson's disease: A review

Iracema Leroi, Deborah Collins, Laura Marsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To review the clinical management of cognitive impairment and dementia related to Parkinson's disease (PD), with emphasis on pharmacologic intervention strategies such as cholinesterase inhibitors. Data sources: A MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and Cochrane Collaboration search of English language literature from 1970 to 2004 was performed to identify reviews, studies, case reports, and letters pertaining to the treatment of cognitive impairment in PD. The bibliographies of selected articles were reviewed for additional references. Study selection: Human studies or case reports in adults with PD describing the use of drug and other therapies for the treatment of cognitive impairment in PD. Data extraction: Studies were reviewed for study design, number of subjects, outcome measures, dosage, side-effects, particularly, worsening of PD motor symptoms. Conclusion: The strongest evidence for the pharmacological treatment of cognitive impairment and dementia in PD supports the use of cholinesterase inhibitors. Evidence for the efficacy and safety of other agents in PD dementia is either insufficient or inconclusive, but offers intriguing clues for potential future treatments. No reports from the Cochrane Collaboration were found.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-114
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume248
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 25 2006

Keywords

  • Atomoxetine
  • Cholinesterase inhibitors
  • Dementia
  • Executive dysfunction
  • Memantine
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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