Nomenclature and definitions for emergency department human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing: Report from the 2007 conference of the national emergency department HIV testing consortium

Michael S. Lyons, Christopher J. Lindsell, Jason S. Haukoos, Gregory Almond, Jeremy Brown, Yvette Calderon, Eileen Couture, Roland C. Merchant, Douglas A.E. White, Richard E. Rothman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Early diagnosis of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through diagnostic testing and screening is a critical priority for individual and public health. Emergency departments (EDs) have an important role in this effort. As EDs gain experience in HIV testing, it is increasingly apparent that implementing testing is conceptually and operationally complex. A wide variety of HIV testing practice and research models have emerged, each reflecting adaptations to site-specific factors and the needs of local populations. The diversity and complexity inherent in nascent ED HIV testing practice and research are associated with the risk that findings will not be described according to a common lexicon. This article presents a comprehensive set of terms and definitions that can be used to describe ED-based HIV testing programs, developed by consensus opinion from the inaugural meeting of the National ED HIV Testing Consortium. These definitions are designed to facilitate discussion, increase comparability of future reports, and potentially accelerate wider implementation of ED HIV testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-177
Number of pages10
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Keywords

  • Consensus
  • Definitions
  • Emergency department
  • Guidelines
  • HIV testing
  • Human immunodeflciency virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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