No patient left behind: The promise of immune priming with epigenetic agents

Corey A. Carter, Bryan T. Oronsky, Joseph Roswarski, Arnold L. Oronsky, Neil Oronsky, Jan Scicinski, Harry Lybeck, Michelle M. Kim, Michelle Lybeck, Tony R. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Checkpoint inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies that inhibit PD-1 or CTLA-4, have revolutionized the treatment of multiple cancers. Despite the enthusiasm for the clinical successes of checkpoint inhibitors, and immunotherapy, in general, only a minority of patients with specific tumor types actually benefit from treatment. Emerging evidence implicates epigenetic alterations as a mechanism of clinical resistance to immunotherapy. This review presents evidence for that association, summarizes the epi-based mechanisms by which tumors evade immunogenic cell death, discusses epigenetic modulation as a component of an integrated strategy to boost anticancer T cell effector function in relation to a tumor immunosuppression cycle and, finally, makes the case that the success of this no-patient-left-behind strategy critically depends on the toxicity profile of the epigenetic agent(s).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1315486
JournalOncoImmunology
Volume6
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2017

Keywords

  • Immunotherapy
  • checkpoint inhibitors
  • epigenetic modulation
  • immunogenic cell death
  • immunosuppression
  • resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Oncology

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  • Cite this

    Carter, C. A., Oronsky, B. T., Roswarski, J., Oronsky, A. L., Oronsky, N., Scicinski, J., Lybeck, H., Kim, M. M., Lybeck, M., & Reid, T. R. (2017). No patient left behind: The promise of immune priming with epigenetic agents. OncoImmunology, 6(10), [e1315486]. https://doi.org/10.1080/2162402X.2017.1315486