No "magic bullet": Exploring community mobilization strategies used in a multi-site community based randomized controlled trial: Project accept (HPTN 043)

Virginia A. Tedrow, Carla E. Zelaya, Caitlin E. Kennedy, Stephen F. Morin, Gertrude Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Michael D. Sweat, David D. Celentano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As community-level interventions become more common in HIV prevention, processes such as community mobilization (CM) are increasingly utilized in public health programs and research. Project Accept, a multi-site community randomized controlled trial, is testing the hypothesis that CM coupled with community-based mobile voluntary counseling and testing and post-test support services will alter community norms and reduce the incidence of HIV. By using a multiple-case study approach, this qualitative study identifies seven major community mobilization strategies used in Project Accept, including stakeholder buy-in, formation of community coalitions, community engagement, community participation, raising community awareness, involvement of leaders, and partnership building, and describes three key elements of mobilization success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1217-1226
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Keywords

  • Case study
  • Community mobilization
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Voluntary counseling and testing (vct)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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