No evidence for motor recovery-related cortical reorganization after stroke using resting-state fMRI

Meret Branscheidt, Naveed Ejaz, Jing Xu, Mario Widmer, Michelle D. Harran, Juan Camillo Cortés, Tomoko Kitago, Pablo Celnik, Carlos Hernandez-Castillo, Jörn Diedrichsen, Andreas Luft, John W. Krakauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cortical reorganization has been suggested as mechanism for recovery after stroke. It has been proposed that a form of cortical reorganization (changes in functional connectivity between brain areas) can be assessed with resting-state fMRI. Here we report the largest longitudinal data-set in terms of overall sessions in 19 patients with subcortical stroke and 11 controls. Patients were imaged up to 5 times over one year. We found no evidence for post-stroke cortical reorganization despite substantial behavioral recovery. These results could be construed as questioning the value of resting-state imaging. Here we argue instead that they are consistent with other emerging reasons to challenge the idea of motor recovery-related cortical reorganization post-stroke when conceived as changes in connectivity between cortical areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUnknown Journal
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 26 2019

Keywords

  • Cortical reorganization
  • Functional connectivity
  • Resting state
  • Stroke recovery
  • Upper extremity impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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