No Effect of a Common Allelic Variant in the Reelin Gene on Intermediate Phenotype Measures of Brain Structure, Brain Function, and Gene Expression

Heike Tost, Barbara K. Lipska, Radhakrishna Vakkalanka, Herve Lemaitre, Joseph H. Callicott, Venkata S. Mattay, Joel E. Kleinman, Stefano Marenco, Daniel R. Weinberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: A recent genome-wide association study linked a common variant in RELN (rs7341475G) with risk for schizophrenia in women. In the largest neuroimaging intermediate phenotype study reported so far, we evaluated the effect of rs7341475 on an extended array of different neuroscientific measures. Methods: Brain structure was evaluated with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging. Brain function during working memory was examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The RELN expression was determined in postmortem brain tissue of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. A total of 736 datasets were examined (voxel-based morphometry: n = 230, diffusion tensor imaging: n = 93, functional magnetic resonance imaging: n = 308, RELN expression: n = 105). Results: Our analyses did not provide evidence for a significant main effect of gene or gene × sex interaction effect on any of the examined measures. Conclusions: This study does not suggest a significant impact of rs7341475 on brain structure, function, and RELN expression, arguing that this single nucleotide polymorphism and others linked with it do not affect brain measures related to the biology of schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-107
Number of pages3
JournalBiological psychiatry
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Gene expression
  • intermediate phenotype study
  • neuroimaging
  • neuronal development
  • reelin
  • schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

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