Nighttime Sleep Duration and Sleep Behaviors among Toddlers from Low-Income Families: Associations with Obesogenic Behaviors and Obesity and the Role of Parenting

Erin R. Hager, Christina J. Calamaro, Lauren M. Bentley, Kristen Marie Hurley, Yan Wang, Maureen M. Black

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Shortened sleep duration is associated with poor health and obesity among young children. Little is known about relationships among nighttime sleep duration, sleep behaviors, and obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers. This study characterizes sleep behaviors/duration and examines relationships with obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers from low-income families. Methods: Mothers of toddlers (age 12-32 months) were recruited from urban/suburban sites serving low-income families. Mothers provided demographic information and completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ); a 6-item Toddler Sleep Behavior Scale was derived (TSBS-BISQ, higher score reflects more recommended behaviors). Toddler weight/length were measured; obesity defined as ≥95th percentile weight-for-length. Measures of obesogenic behaviors: physical activity [accelerometry, minutes/day in Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA)] and diet quality [24-hour recall, Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005)]. Bivariate and adjusted multivariable models examined associations between nighttime sleep behaviors/duration and obesogenic behaviors/obesity. Results: Sample included 240 toddlers (mean age = 20.2 months), 55% male, 69% black, 59% urban. Toddlers spent 55.4 minutes/day in MVPA, mean HEI-2005 score was 55.4, 13% were obese. Mean sleep duration was 9.1 hours, with 35% endorsing 5-6 recommended sleep behaviors (TSBS-BISQ). In multivariable models, MVPA was positively related to sleep duration; obese toddlers had a shorter nighttime sleep duration than healthy weight toddlers [odds ratio = 0.69, p = 0.014]. Nighttime sleep duration was associated with high TSBS-BISQ scores, F = 6.1, p = 0.003. Conclusions: Toddlers with a shorter nighttime sleep duration are at higher risk for obesity and inactivity. Interventions to promote healthy sleep behaviors among toddlers from low-income families may improve nighttime sleep duration and reduce obesogenic behaviors/obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-400
Number of pages9
JournalChildhood Obesity
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Parenting
Sleep
Obesity
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Mothers
Accelerometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Nighttime Sleep Duration and Sleep Behaviors among Toddlers from Low-Income Families : Associations with Obesogenic Behaviors and Obesity and the Role of Parenting. / Hager, Erin R.; Calamaro, Christina J.; Bentley, Lauren M.; Hurley, Kristen Marie; Wang, Yan; Black, Maureen M.

In: Childhood Obesity, Vol. 12, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 392-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hager, Erin R. ; Calamaro, Christina J. ; Bentley, Lauren M. ; Hurley, Kristen Marie ; Wang, Yan ; Black, Maureen M. / Nighttime Sleep Duration and Sleep Behaviors among Toddlers from Low-Income Families : Associations with Obesogenic Behaviors and Obesity and the Role of Parenting. In: Childhood Obesity. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 392-400.
@article{5b4056b47f2040b08a8d590b462534db,
title = "Nighttime Sleep Duration and Sleep Behaviors among Toddlers from Low-Income Families: Associations with Obesogenic Behaviors and Obesity and the Role of Parenting",
abstract = "Background: Shortened sleep duration is associated with poor health and obesity among young children. Little is known about relationships among nighttime sleep duration, sleep behaviors, and obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers. This study characterizes sleep behaviors/duration and examines relationships with obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers from low-income families. Methods: Mothers of toddlers (age 12-32 months) were recruited from urban/suburban sites serving low-income families. Mothers provided demographic information and completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ); a 6-item Toddler Sleep Behavior Scale was derived (TSBS-BISQ, higher score reflects more recommended behaviors). Toddler weight/length were measured; obesity defined as ≥95th percentile weight-for-length. Measures of obesogenic behaviors: physical activity [accelerometry, minutes/day in Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA)] and diet quality [24-hour recall, Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005)]. Bivariate and adjusted multivariable models examined associations between nighttime sleep behaviors/duration and obesogenic behaviors/obesity. Results: Sample included 240 toddlers (mean age = 20.2 months), 55{\%} male, 69{\%} black, 59{\%} urban. Toddlers spent 55.4 minutes/day in MVPA, mean HEI-2005 score was 55.4, 13{\%} were obese. Mean sleep duration was 9.1 hours, with 35{\%} endorsing 5-6 recommended sleep behaviors (TSBS-BISQ). In multivariable models, MVPA was positively related to sleep duration; obese toddlers had a shorter nighttime sleep duration than healthy weight toddlers [odds ratio = 0.69, p = 0.014]. Nighttime sleep duration was associated with high TSBS-BISQ scores, F = 6.1, p = 0.003. Conclusions: Toddlers with a shorter nighttime sleep duration are at higher risk for obesity and inactivity. Interventions to promote healthy sleep behaviors among toddlers from low-income families may improve nighttime sleep duration and reduce obesogenic behaviors/obesity.",
author = "Hager, {Erin R.} and Calamaro, {Christina J.} and Bentley, {Lauren M.} and Hurley, {Kristen Marie} and Yan Wang and Black, {Maureen M.}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/chi.2015.0252",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "392--400",
journal = "Childhood Obesity",
issn = "2153-2168",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nighttime Sleep Duration and Sleep Behaviors among Toddlers from Low-Income Families

T2 - Associations with Obesogenic Behaviors and Obesity and the Role of Parenting

AU - Hager, Erin R.

AU - Calamaro, Christina J.

AU - Bentley, Lauren M.

AU - Hurley, Kristen Marie

AU - Wang, Yan

AU - Black, Maureen M.

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background: Shortened sleep duration is associated with poor health and obesity among young children. Little is known about relationships among nighttime sleep duration, sleep behaviors, and obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers. This study characterizes sleep behaviors/duration and examines relationships with obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers from low-income families. Methods: Mothers of toddlers (age 12-32 months) were recruited from urban/suburban sites serving low-income families. Mothers provided demographic information and completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ); a 6-item Toddler Sleep Behavior Scale was derived (TSBS-BISQ, higher score reflects more recommended behaviors). Toddler weight/length were measured; obesity defined as ≥95th percentile weight-for-length. Measures of obesogenic behaviors: physical activity [accelerometry, minutes/day in Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA)] and diet quality [24-hour recall, Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005)]. Bivariate and adjusted multivariable models examined associations between nighttime sleep behaviors/duration and obesogenic behaviors/obesity. Results: Sample included 240 toddlers (mean age = 20.2 months), 55% male, 69% black, 59% urban. Toddlers spent 55.4 minutes/day in MVPA, mean HEI-2005 score was 55.4, 13% were obese. Mean sleep duration was 9.1 hours, with 35% endorsing 5-6 recommended sleep behaviors (TSBS-BISQ). In multivariable models, MVPA was positively related to sleep duration; obese toddlers had a shorter nighttime sleep duration than healthy weight toddlers [odds ratio = 0.69, p = 0.014]. Nighttime sleep duration was associated with high TSBS-BISQ scores, F = 6.1, p = 0.003. Conclusions: Toddlers with a shorter nighttime sleep duration are at higher risk for obesity and inactivity. Interventions to promote healthy sleep behaviors among toddlers from low-income families may improve nighttime sleep duration and reduce obesogenic behaviors/obesity.

AB - Background: Shortened sleep duration is associated with poor health and obesity among young children. Little is known about relationships among nighttime sleep duration, sleep behaviors, and obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers. This study characterizes sleep behaviors/duration and examines relationships with obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers from low-income families. Methods: Mothers of toddlers (age 12-32 months) were recruited from urban/suburban sites serving low-income families. Mothers provided demographic information and completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ); a 6-item Toddler Sleep Behavior Scale was derived (TSBS-BISQ, higher score reflects more recommended behaviors). Toddler weight/length were measured; obesity defined as ≥95th percentile weight-for-length. Measures of obesogenic behaviors: physical activity [accelerometry, minutes/day in Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA)] and diet quality [24-hour recall, Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005)]. Bivariate and adjusted multivariable models examined associations between nighttime sleep behaviors/duration and obesogenic behaviors/obesity. Results: Sample included 240 toddlers (mean age = 20.2 months), 55% male, 69% black, 59% urban. Toddlers spent 55.4 minutes/day in MVPA, mean HEI-2005 score was 55.4, 13% were obese. Mean sleep duration was 9.1 hours, with 35% endorsing 5-6 recommended sleep behaviors (TSBS-BISQ). In multivariable models, MVPA was positively related to sleep duration; obese toddlers had a shorter nighttime sleep duration than healthy weight toddlers [odds ratio = 0.69, p = 0.014]. Nighttime sleep duration was associated with high TSBS-BISQ scores, F = 6.1, p = 0.003. Conclusions: Toddlers with a shorter nighttime sleep duration are at higher risk for obesity and inactivity. Interventions to promote healthy sleep behaviors among toddlers from low-income families may improve nighttime sleep duration and reduce obesogenic behaviors/obesity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989193446&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84989193446&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/chi.2015.0252

DO - 10.1089/chi.2015.0252

M3 - Article

C2 - 27447782

AN - SCOPUS:84989193446

VL - 12

SP - 392

EP - 400

JO - Childhood Obesity

JF - Childhood Obesity

SN - 2153-2168

IS - 5

ER -