Night-to-night variability of polysomnography in children with suspected obstructive sleep apnea

Eliot S. Katz, Mary G. Greene, Kathryn A. Carson, Patricia Galster, Gerald M. Loughlin, John Carroll, Carole L. Marcus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether a single polysomnographic night was a valid measure of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing. Study design: The night-to-night variability of respiratory and sleep parameters was measured prospectively in 30 snoring children aged 1.6 to 11.3 years (mean ± SD, 4.1 ± 2) by using 2 nocturnal polysomnograms performed 7 to 27 days apart (14 ± 5 days). Results: The mean of the respiratory variables including apnea index, apnea/hypopnea index, arterial oxygen saturation, and end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide were not significantly different from night to night. Among the sleep parameters, there was no significant night-to-night difference in sleep efficiency, arousal index, percent rapid eye movement, or percent of slow wave sleep. Only the percentage of stage 2 was significantly different between the nights. The polysomnographic clinical diagnosis remained the same on both nights for all children, although the disease severity differed slightly in 2 patients. Conclusions: There is little clinically significant night-to-night variability in pediatric polysomnography, and no first-night effect. These data suggest that a single polysomnographic night is an adequate measure of the OSAS in children with symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)589-594
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume140
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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