Niacin and statin combination therapy for atherosclerosis regression and prevention of cardiovascular disease events

Reconciling the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial with previous surrogate endpoint trials

Erin Donnelly Michos, Christopher T. Sibley, Jefferson T. Baer, Michael Blaha, Roger S Blumenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite substantial risk reductions targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statins, there remains significant residual risk as evidenced by incident and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among statin-treated patients. Observational studies have shown that low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with increased CVD risk. It remains unclear whether strategies aimed at increasing HDL-C in addition to background statin therapy will further reduce risk. The AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial, which compared combined niacin/simvastatin with simvastatin alone, failed to demonstrate an incremental benefit of niacin among patients with atherosclerotic CVD and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2058-2064
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume59
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2012

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Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Niacin
Atherosclerosis
Triglycerides
Cardiovascular Diseases
Simvastatin
Biomarkers
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Risk Reduction Behavior
Observational Studies
Therapeutics
Global Health

Keywords

  • AIM-HIGH
  • HDL
  • lipids
  • niacin
  • review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Niacin and statin combination therapy for atherosclerosis regression and prevention of cardiovascular disease events: Reconciling the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial with previous surrogate endpoint trials",
abstract = "Despite substantial risk reductions targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statins, there remains significant residual risk as evidenced by incident and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among statin-treated patients. Observational studies have shown that low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with increased CVD risk. It remains unclear whether strategies aimed at increasing HDL-C in addition to background statin therapy will further reduce risk. The AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial, which compared combined niacin/simvastatin with simvastatin alone, failed to demonstrate an incremental benefit of niacin among patients with atherosclerotic CVD and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values",
keywords = "AIM-HIGH, HDL, lipids, niacin, review",
author = "Michos, {Erin Donnelly} and Sibley, {Christopher T.} and Baer, {Jefferson T.} and Michael Blaha and Blumenthal, {Roger S}",
year = "2012",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Niacin and statin combination therapy for atherosclerosis regression and prevention of cardiovascular disease events

T2 - Reconciling the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial with previous surrogate endpoint trials

AU - Michos, Erin Donnelly

AU - Sibley, Christopher T.

AU - Baer, Jefferson T.

AU - Blaha, Michael

AU - Blumenthal, Roger S

PY - 2012/6/5

Y1 - 2012/6/5

N2 - Despite substantial risk reductions targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statins, there remains significant residual risk as evidenced by incident and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among statin-treated patients. Observational studies have shown that low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with increased CVD risk. It remains unclear whether strategies aimed at increasing HDL-C in addition to background statin therapy will further reduce risk. The AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial, which compared combined niacin/simvastatin with simvastatin alone, failed to demonstrate an incremental benefit of niacin among patients with atherosclerotic CVD and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values

AB - Despite substantial risk reductions targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statins, there remains significant residual risk as evidenced by incident and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among statin-treated patients. Observational studies have shown that low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with increased CVD risk. It remains unclear whether strategies aimed at increasing HDL-C in addition to background statin therapy will further reduce risk. The AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial, which compared combined niacin/simvastatin with simvastatin alone, failed to demonstrate an incremental benefit of niacin among patients with atherosclerotic CVD and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values

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KW - review

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