New tuberculosis drug development

Targeting the shikimate pathway

Senta M. Kapnick, Ying Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet no new drugs have been developed in the last 40 years. Objective: The exceedingly lengthy TB chemotherapy and the increasing emergence of drug resistance complicated by HIV co-infection call for the development of new TB drugs. These problems are further compounded by a poor understanding of the biology of persister bacteria. Methods: New molecular tools have offered insights into potential new drug targets, particularly the enzymes of the shikimate pathway, which is the focus of this review. Results/conclusion: Shikimate pathway enzymes, especially shikimate kinase, may offer attractive targets for new TB drug and vaccine development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-577
Number of pages13
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Drug Delivery Systems
Tuberculosis
shikimate kinase
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Tuberculosis Vaccines
Enzymes
Coinfection
Drug Resistance
HIV Infections
Morbidity
Bacteria
Drug Therapy
Mortality

Keywords

  • Drug development
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • Shikimate kinase
  • Shikimate pathway

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

New tuberculosis drug development : Targeting the shikimate pathway. / Kapnick, Senta M.; Zhang, Ying.

In: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery, Vol. 3, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 565-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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