New treatment approaches in acute myeloid leukemia: Review of Recent Clinical Studies

Kelly Norsworthy, Leo Luznik, Ivana Gojo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Standard chemotherapy can cure only a fraction (30-40%) of younger and very few older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While conventional allografting can extend the cure rates, its application remains limited mostly to younger patients and those in remission. Limited efficacy of current therapies and improved understanding of the disease biology provided a spur for clinical trials examining novel agents and therapeutic strategies in AML. Clinical studies with novel chemotherapeutics, antibodies, different signal transduction inhibitors, and epigenetic modulators demonstrated their clinical activity; however, it remains unclear how to successfully integrate novel agents either alone or in combination with chemotherapy into the overall therapeutic schema for AML. Further studies are needed to examine their role in relation to standard chemotherapy and their applicability to select patient populations based on recognition of unique disease and patient characteristics, including the development of predictive biomarkers of response. With increasing use of nonmyeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning and alternative graft sources such as haploidentical donors and cord blood transplants, the benefits of allografting may extend to a broader patient population, including older AML patients and those lacking a HLA-matched donor. We will review here recent clinical studies that examined novel pharmacologic and immunologic approaches to AML therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-237
Number of pages14
JournalReviews on Recent Clinical Trials
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • Chemotherapy
  • Novel agents
  • Transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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