New spinal robotic technologies

Bowen Jiang, Tej D. Azad, Ethan Cottrill, Corinna C. Zygourakis, Alex M. Zhu, Neil Crawford, Nicholas Theodore

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Robotic systems in surgery have developed rapidly. Installations of the da Vinci Surgical System® (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), widely used in urological and gynecological procedures, have nearly doubled in the United States from 2010 to 2017. Robotics systems in spine surgery have been adopted more slowly; however, users are enthusiastic about their applications in this subspecialty. Spinal surgery often requires fine manipulation of vital structures that must be accessed via limited surgical corridors and can require repetitive tasks over lengthy periods of time — issues for which robotic assistance is well-positioned to complement human ability. To date, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved 7 robotic systems across 4 companies for use in spinal surgery. The available clinical data evaluating their efficacy have generally demonstrated these systems to be accurate and safe. A critical next step in the broader adoption of surgical robotics in spine surgery is the design and implementation of rigorous comparative studies to interrogate the utility of robotic assistance. Here we discuss current applications of robotics in spine surgery, review robotic systems FDA-approved for use in spine surgery, summarize randomized controlled trials involving robotics in spine surgery, and comment on prospects of robotic-assisted spine surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFrontiers of Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Robotics
Technology
Spine
United States Food and Drug Administration
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • ExcelsiusGPS
  • Mazor
  • pedicle screw
  • robotics
  • ROSA
  • spine surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jiang, B., Azad, T. D., Cottrill, E., Zygourakis, C. C., Zhu, A. M., Crawford, N., & Theodore, N. (Accepted/In press). New spinal robotic technologies. Frontiers of Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11684-019-0716-6

New spinal robotic technologies. / Jiang, Bowen; Azad, Tej D.; Cottrill, Ethan; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Zhu, Alex M.; Crawford, Neil; Theodore, Nicholas.

In: Frontiers of Medicine, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Jiang, B, Azad, TD, Cottrill, E, Zygourakis, CC, Zhu, AM, Crawford, N & Theodore, N 2019, 'New spinal robotic technologies', Frontiers of Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11684-019-0716-6
Jiang B, Azad TD, Cottrill E, Zygourakis CC, Zhu AM, Crawford N et al. New spinal robotic technologies. Frontiers of Medicine. 2019 Jan 1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11684-019-0716-6
Jiang, Bowen ; Azad, Tej D. ; Cottrill, Ethan ; Zygourakis, Corinna C. ; Zhu, Alex M. ; Crawford, Neil ; Theodore, Nicholas. / New spinal robotic technologies. In: Frontiers of Medicine. 2019.
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