New Persistent Opioid Use After Aortic and Mitral Valve Surgery in Commercially Insured Patients

Kathleen C. Clement, Joseph K. Canner, Glenn J.R. Whitman, Jennifer S. Lawton, Michael C. Grant, Marc S. Sussman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Deaths from prescription opioid overdose are dramatically increasing. This study evaluates the incidence, risk factors, and cost of new persistent opioid use after aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement, and mitral valve repair. Methods: Insurance claims from commercially insured patients who underwent aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement, mitral valve repair, or aortic valve replacement and mitral valve replacement/repair from 2014 to 2016 were evaluated. New persistent opioid use was defined as opioid-naive patients who filled an opioid prescription in the perioperative period and filled opioid prescriptions between 90 and 180 days postoperatively. Multivariable logistic regression identified risk factors for new persistent opioid use. Quantile regression evaluated the impact of new persistent opioid use on total healthcare payments in the 6 months after discharge. Results: Among 3404 opioid-naive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement, or mitral valve repair, 188 (5.5%) had new persistent opioid use. Living in the southern United States (odds ratio, 1.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.63; P < .001) and increased opioids prescribed in the perioperative period (odds ratio, 1.009; 95% confidence interval, 1.006-1.012; P < .001) were independently associated with new persistent opioid use. After risk adjustment, new persistent opioid use was associated with a 2-fold higher number of emergency department visits (odds ratio, 2.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-3.03; P < .001) and a $5422 increase in healthcare payments in the 6 months after discharge. Conclusions: New persistent opioid use is a significant and costly complication after aortic and mitral valve surgery in privately insured patients. Variation in regional susceptibility and opioid prescribing suggests that standardization may help prevent this complication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)829-835
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume110
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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