Neutrophil responses to sterile implant materials

Siddharth Jhunjhunwala, Stephanie Aresta-DaSilva, Katherine Tang, David Alvarez, Matthew J. Webber, Benjamin C. Tang, Danya M. Lavin, Omid Veiseh, Joshua Doloff, Suman Bose, Arturo Vegas, Minglin Ma, Gaurav Sahay, Alan Chiu, Andrew Bader, Erin Langan, Sean Siebert, Jie Li, Dale L. Greiner, Peter E. Newburger & 3 others Ulrich H. Von Andrian, Robert Langer, Daniel G. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0137550
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2015

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prostheses
neutrophils
Neutrophils
Foreign Bodies
foreign bodies
Chemokines
Capsules
Equipment and Supplies
Cytokines
medical equipment
Exudates and Transudates
chemokines
fibrosis
Fibrosis
cytokines
traps
animal models
immune response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Jhunjhunwala, S., Aresta-DaSilva, S., Tang, K., Alvarez, D., Webber, M. J., Tang, B. C., ... Anderson, D. G. (2015). Neutrophil responses to sterile implant materials. PloS one, 10(9), [e0137550]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137550

Neutrophil responses to sterile implant materials. / Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Aresta-DaSilva, Stephanie; Tang, Katherine; Alvarez, David; Webber, Matthew J.; Tang, Benjamin C.; Lavin, Danya M.; Veiseh, Omid; Doloff, Joshua; Bose, Suman; Vegas, Arturo; Ma, Minglin; Sahay, Gaurav; Chiu, Alan; Bader, Andrew; Langan, Erin; Siebert, Sean; Li, Jie; Greiner, Dale L.; Newburger, Peter E.; Von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

In: PloS one, Vol. 10, No. 9, e0137550, 10.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jhunjhunwala, S, Aresta-DaSilva, S, Tang, K, Alvarez, D, Webber, MJ, Tang, BC, Lavin, DM, Veiseh, O, Doloff, J, Bose, S, Vegas, A, Ma, M, Sahay, G, Chiu, A, Bader, A, Langan, E, Siebert, S, Li, J, Greiner, DL, Newburger, PE, Von Andrian, UH, Langer, R & Anderson, DG 2015, 'Neutrophil responses to sterile implant materials', PloS one, vol. 10, no. 9, e0137550. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137550
Jhunjhunwala S, Aresta-DaSilva S, Tang K, Alvarez D, Webber MJ, Tang BC et al. Neutrophil responses to sterile implant materials. PloS one. 2015 Sep 10;10(9). e0137550. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137550
Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth ; Aresta-DaSilva, Stephanie ; Tang, Katherine ; Alvarez, David ; Webber, Matthew J. ; Tang, Benjamin C. ; Lavin, Danya M. ; Veiseh, Omid ; Doloff, Joshua ; Bose, Suman ; Vegas, Arturo ; Ma, Minglin ; Sahay, Gaurav ; Chiu, Alan ; Bader, Andrew ; Langan, Erin ; Siebert, Sean ; Li, Jie ; Greiner, Dale L. ; Newburger, Peter E. ; Von Andrian, Ulrich H. ; Langer, Robert ; Anderson, Daniel G. / Neutrophil responses to sterile implant materials. In: PloS one. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 9.
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abstract = "In vivo implantation of sterile materials and devices results in a foreign body immune response leading to fibrosis of implanted material. Neutrophils, one of the first immune cells to be recruited to implantation sites, have been suggested to contribute to the establishment of the inflammatory microenvironment that initiates the fibrotic response. However, the precise numbers and roles of neutrophils in response to implanted devices remains unclear. Using a mouse model of peritoneal microcapsule implantation, we show 30-500 fold increased neutrophil presence in the peritoneal exudates in response to implants. We demonstrate that these neutrophils secrete increased amounts of a variety of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, we observe that they participate in the foreign body response through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) on implant surfaces. Our results provide new insight into neutrophil function during a foreign body response to peritoneal implants which has implications for the development of biologically compatible medical devices.",
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