Neurotrophic strategies for treating Alzheimer's disease: Lessons from basic neurobiology and animal models

Vassilis El Koliatsos, D. L. Price, R. E. Clatterbuck, A. L. Markowska, D. S. Olton, B. J. Wilcox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Because neurotrophic factors can prevent natural and experirmental cases of neural cell death and induce and maintain differentiation, they are especially attractive agents for the treatment of neurodegnerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present report argues for the specific role of particular families of trophic factors, such as neurotrophins (e.g., nerve growth factor [NGF]) and neurokines (e.g., ciliary neurotrophic factor [CNTF]), for the promotion of the survival and phenotype of subsets of central nervous system (CNS) neurons vulnerable in AD, such as basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and cortical projection neurons. Although there is ample evidence for the therapeutic role of NGF in experimental or natural injury of cholinergic neurons, not enough progress has been made on trophic models involving cortical neurons. Further understanding of the mechanisms of cell death in AD and elucidation of the transduction cascades of trophic factors will undoubtedly refine our current concepts of a neurotrophic treatment for AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-299
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume695
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Neurobiology
Neurons
Alzheimer Disease
Animals
Animal Models
Cholinergic Neurons
Nerve Growth Factors
Nerve Growth Factor
Cell death
Cell Death
Cholinergic Agents
Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor
Neurology
Central Nervous System
Phenotype
Neuron
Animal Model
Alzheimer's Disease
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Neurotrophic strategies for treating Alzheimer's disease : Lessons from basic neurobiology and animal models. / Koliatsos, Vassilis El; Price, D. L.; Clatterbuck, R. E.; Markowska, A. L.; Olton, D. S.; Wilcox, B. J.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 695, 1993, p. 292-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koliatsos, Vassilis El ; Price, D. L. ; Clatterbuck, R. E. ; Markowska, A. L. ; Olton, D. S. ; Wilcox, B. J. / Neurotrophic strategies for treating Alzheimer's disease : Lessons from basic neurobiology and animal models. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1993 ; Vol. 695. pp. 292-299.
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