Neurosyphilis Masquerading as Herpes Encephalitis

Krishna Dass, Shmuel Shoham, Daniel R. Lucey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Classic presentations of neurosyphilis, such as tabes dorsalis and general paresis, are rare today. Instead, neurosyphilis can present with a spectrum of diverse clinical manifestations. Therefore, neurosyphilis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with unexplained neurologic deficit or encephalitis. We report a patient who had a nonbloody spinal fluid venereal disease research laboratory titer of 1:32, but presented with a clinical syndrome, MRI findings, and an electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern consistent with herpes simplex encephalitis. Admission spinal fluid PCR for herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 was negative in 2 reference laboratories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-31
Number of pages2
JournalInfectious Diseases in Clinical Practice
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Neurosyphilis
Herpes Simplex Encephalitis
Tabes Dorsalis
Human Herpesvirus 2
Human Herpesvirus 1
Encephalitis
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Electroencephalography
Differential Diagnosis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Neurosyphilis Masquerading as Herpes Encephalitis. / Dass, Krishna; Shoham, Shmuel; Lucey, Daniel R.

In: Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 30-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dass, Krishna ; Shoham, Shmuel ; Lucey, Daniel R. / Neurosyphilis Masquerading as Herpes Encephalitis. In: Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice. 2004 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 30-31.
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