Neurostimulant medication usage during stroke rehabilitation: The Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Outcomes Project (PSROP)

Richard D. Zorowitz, Randall J. Smout, Julie A. Gassaway, Susan D. Horn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Motor recovery after a stroke depends upon many upon different modalities. Intensive therapy using compensatory and facilitatory techniques is the primary method to improve movement and function in affected extremities. However, medications used to modulate neurotransmitters may be useful in augmenting therapy approaches. The Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Outcomes Project (PSROP) database was used to describe the frequency of prescribing neurostimulant medications; the types of neurostimulant medications used; and how the use of neurostimulant medications affected rehabilitation length of stay, motor recovery, cognitive recovery, and discharge destination. Of the 1,161 patients in the PSROP database, 929 (80.0%) patients did not receive any treatment with methylphenidate, modafinil, levodopa, amantadine, or bromocriptine. Patients who received neurostimulant medications did not have any more significant changes in length of stay, motor recovery, cognitive recovery, or discharge destination than patients who did not receive neurostimulant medications. Much research needs to be completed before clinicians know precisely whether and how rehabilitation therapies and medications interact to assist in functional recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-36
Number of pages9
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

Keywords

  • Amantadine
  • Bromocriptine
  • Cerebrovascular accident
  • Cerebrovascular disorders
  • Levodopa
  • Methylphenidate
  • Modafinil
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Community and Home Care
  • Clinical Neurology

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