Neuroregulation of human nasal mucosa

James N. Baraniuk, Samantha J. Merck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Multiple subsets of nociceptive, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nerves innervate human nasal mucosa. These play carefully coordinated roles in regulating glandular, vascular, and other processes. These functions are vital for cleaning and humidifying ambient air before it is inhaled into the lungs. The recent identification of distinct classes of nociceptive nerves with unique patterns of transient receptor potential sensory receptor ion channel proteins may account for the polymodal, chemo- and mechanicosensitivity of many trigeminal neurons. Modulation of these families of proteins, excitatory and inhibitory autoreceptors, and combinations of neurotransmitters introduces a new level of complexity and subtlety to nasal innervation. These findings may provide a rational basis for responses to air-temperature changes, culinary and botanical odorants ("aromatherapy"), and inhaled irritants in conditions as diverse as allergic and nonallergic rhinitis, occupational rhinitis, hyposmia, and multiple chemical sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Symposium on Olfaction and Taste
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Inc.
Pages604-609
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781573317382
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1170
ISSN (Print)0077-8923
ISSN (Electronic)1749-6632

Keywords

  • Nociception
  • Nociceptive axon response
  • TRPV1
  • Transient receptor potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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