Neuropsychological test profile differences between young and old human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals

Ned Sacktor, Richard Skolasky, Ola A. Selnes, Michael Watters, Pamela Poff, Bruce Shiramizu, Cecilia Shikuma, Victor Valcour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dementia remains as an important cause of neurological morbidity among HIV-seropositive (HIV+) individuals. Differences in the neuropsychological profiles between older and younger HIV+ individuals have not been examined extensively. The objective of this study was to examine the neuropsychological test performance between old and young HIV+ individuals (a) with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort) and (b) with dementia. One hundred thirty-three older (age ≥50 years) HIV+ individuals and 121 younger (age 20 to 39 years) HIV+ individuals were evaluated with a standardized neuropsychological test battery. Differences between age groups in the mean z score for each neuropsychological test were determined. The older HIV+ (total) cohort had greater impairment in tests of verbal memory (P = .006), visual memory (P <.002), verbal fluency (P = .001), and psychomotor speed (P <.001) compared to the young HIV+ (total) cohort. After adjusting for differences in education, older HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 31) had a greater deficit in the Trail Making test Part B (P = 0.02) compared to younger HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 15). Age was associated with lower performance in tests of memory, executive functioning, and motor performance in older HIV+ individuals with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort), compared to younger HIV+ individuals. Among HIV+ patients with dementia, age may be associated with greater impairment in a test of executive functioning. These differences could be a result of advanced age itself or age-associated comorbidities such as coexisting cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-209
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of NeuroVirology
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Neuropsychological Tests
HIV
Dementia
Trail Making Test
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Comorbidity

Keywords

  • Age
  • Dementia
  • HIV
  • Neuropsychological
  • Test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Neuropsychological test profile differences between young and old human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals. / Sacktor, Ned; Skolasky, Richard; Selnes, Ola A.; Watters, Michael; Poff, Pamela; Shiramizu, Bruce; Shikuma, Cecilia; Valcour, Victor.

In: Journal of NeuroVirology, Vol. 13, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 203-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sacktor, Ned ; Skolasky, Richard ; Selnes, Ola A. ; Watters, Michael ; Poff, Pamela ; Shiramizu, Bruce ; Shikuma, Cecilia ; Valcour, Victor. / Neuropsychological test profile differences between young and old human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals. In: Journal of NeuroVirology. 2007 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 203-209.
@article{b564ec7ca2c74d018c14b7278f984fef,
title = "Neuropsychological test profile differences between young and old human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals",
abstract = "Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dementia remains as an important cause of neurological morbidity among HIV-seropositive (HIV+) individuals. Differences in the neuropsychological profiles between older and younger HIV+ individuals have not been examined extensively. The objective of this study was to examine the neuropsychological test performance between old and young HIV+ individuals (a) with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort) and (b) with dementia. One hundred thirty-three older (age ≥50 years) HIV+ individuals and 121 younger (age 20 to 39 years) HIV+ individuals were evaluated with a standardized neuropsychological test battery. Differences between age groups in the mean z score for each neuropsychological test were determined. The older HIV+ (total) cohort had greater impairment in tests of verbal memory (P = .006), visual memory (P <.002), verbal fluency (P = .001), and psychomotor speed (P <.001) compared to the young HIV+ (total) cohort. After adjusting for differences in education, older HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 31) had a greater deficit in the Trail Making test Part B (P = 0.02) compared to younger HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 15). Age was associated with lower performance in tests of memory, executive functioning, and motor performance in older HIV+ individuals with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort), compared to younger HIV+ individuals. Among HIV+ patients with dementia, age may be associated with greater impairment in a test of executive functioning. These differences could be a result of advanced age itself or age-associated comorbidities such as coexisting cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative disease.",
keywords = "Age, Dementia, HIV, Neuropsychological, Test",
author = "Ned Sacktor and Richard Skolasky and Selnes, {Ola A.} and Michael Watters and Pamela Poff and Bruce Shiramizu and Cecilia Shikuma and Victor Valcour",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1080/13550280701258423",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "203--209",
journal = "Journal of NeuroVirology",
issn = "1355-0284",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuropsychological test profile differences between young and old human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals

AU - Sacktor, Ned

AU - Skolasky, Richard

AU - Selnes, Ola A.

AU - Watters, Michael

AU - Poff, Pamela

AU - Shiramizu, Bruce

AU - Shikuma, Cecilia

AU - Valcour, Victor

PY - 2007/5

Y1 - 2007/5

N2 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dementia remains as an important cause of neurological morbidity among HIV-seropositive (HIV+) individuals. Differences in the neuropsychological profiles between older and younger HIV+ individuals have not been examined extensively. The objective of this study was to examine the neuropsychological test performance between old and young HIV+ individuals (a) with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort) and (b) with dementia. One hundred thirty-three older (age ≥50 years) HIV+ individuals and 121 younger (age 20 to 39 years) HIV+ individuals were evaluated with a standardized neuropsychological test battery. Differences between age groups in the mean z score for each neuropsychological test were determined. The older HIV+ (total) cohort had greater impairment in tests of verbal memory (P = .006), visual memory (P <.002), verbal fluency (P = .001), and psychomotor speed (P <.001) compared to the young HIV+ (total) cohort. After adjusting for differences in education, older HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 31) had a greater deficit in the Trail Making test Part B (P = 0.02) compared to younger HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 15). Age was associated with lower performance in tests of memory, executive functioning, and motor performance in older HIV+ individuals with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort), compared to younger HIV+ individuals. Among HIV+ patients with dementia, age may be associated with greater impairment in a test of executive functioning. These differences could be a result of advanced age itself or age-associated comorbidities such as coexisting cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative disease.

AB - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dementia remains as an important cause of neurological morbidity among HIV-seropositive (HIV+) individuals. Differences in the neuropsychological profiles between older and younger HIV+ individuals have not been examined extensively. The objective of this study was to examine the neuropsychological test performance between old and young HIV+ individuals (a) with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort) and (b) with dementia. One hundred thirty-three older (age ≥50 years) HIV+ individuals and 121 younger (age 20 to 39 years) HIV+ individuals were evaluated with a standardized neuropsychological test battery. Differences between age groups in the mean z score for each neuropsychological test were determined. The older HIV+ (total) cohort had greater impairment in tests of verbal memory (P = .006), visual memory (P <.002), verbal fluency (P = .001), and psychomotor speed (P <.001) compared to the young HIV+ (total) cohort. After adjusting for differences in education, older HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 31) had a greater deficit in the Trail Making test Part B (P = 0.02) compared to younger HIV+ patients with dementia (n = 15). Age was associated with lower performance in tests of memory, executive functioning, and motor performance in older HIV+ individuals with and without cognitive impairment (total cohort), compared to younger HIV+ individuals. Among HIV+ patients with dementia, age may be associated with greater impairment in a test of executive functioning. These differences could be a result of advanced age itself or age-associated comorbidities such as coexisting cerebrovascular or neurodegenerative disease.

KW - Age

KW - Dementia

KW - HIV

KW - Neuropsychological

KW - Test

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34447321312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34447321312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13550280701258423

DO - 10.1080/13550280701258423

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 203

EP - 209

JO - Journal of NeuroVirology

JF - Journal of NeuroVirology

SN - 1355-0284

IS - 3

ER -