Neuropsychological functioning and its relationship to antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

Elizabeth Leritz, Jason Brandt, Melissa Minor, Francis Reis-Jensen, Michelle Petri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While it is clear that central nervous system (CNS) lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) adversely affect cognitive functioning, it is also evident that patients without visible lesions (non-CNS SLE) may also exhibit subtle cognitive impairment. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) has been proposed as a marker of disease severity and hence should be correlated with neuropsychological dysfunction in this population. The current study compared groups of non-CNS lupus patients who were positive (LA+) or negative (LA-) for aPLs on selected measures of neuropsychological functioning. In addition, we attempted to characterize the pattern of cognitive impairment that is associated with LA status in these patients. No coherent neuropsychological pattern emerged, but LA+ patients performed worse than LA- patients on measures assessing attention, concentration, and visual search, as well as spatial learning and memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-533
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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