Neuropsychiatric dysfunction in primary Sjogren's syndrome

K. L. Malinow, R. Molina, Barry Gordon, O. A. Selnes, T. T. Provost, E. L. Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neuropsychiatric complications developed in 40 patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome, none of whom met American Rheumatologic Association criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus. Twenty-five patients had psychiatric abnormalities, the commonest of which were affective disturbances. Of 30 patients tested, 23 had an abnormal pattern in the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, the commonest pattern being a 'conversion V'. In general, patients presented with hysteroid dysphoric features. Of 16 patients undergoing cognitive function testing, 7 showed mild memory impairment with attention and concentration deficits. On clinical evaluation, 27 patients had neurologic abnormalities unattributable to other causes (central and peripheral nervous system in 16 and 19 patients respectively). There was a significant correlation between psychiatric disturbances and neurologic dysfunction, suggesting a possible organic basis for psychiatric dysfunction. The diagnosis of primary Sjogren's syndrome should be considered in patients with unexplained neuropsychiatric illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-350
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume103
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1985

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Sjogren's Syndrome
Psychiatry
Nervous System Malformations
MMPI
Peripheral Nervous System
Neurologic Manifestations
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Cognition
Central Nervous System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Malinow, K. L., Molina, R., Gordon, B., Selnes, O. A., Provost, T. T., & Alexander, E. L. (1985). Neuropsychiatric dysfunction in primary Sjogren's syndrome. Annals of Internal Medicine, 103(3), 344-350.

Neuropsychiatric dysfunction in primary Sjogren's syndrome. / Malinow, K. L.; Molina, R.; Gordon, Barry; Selnes, O. A.; Provost, T. T.; Alexander, E. L.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 103, No. 3, 1985, p. 344-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malinow, KL, Molina, R, Gordon, B, Selnes, OA, Provost, TT & Alexander, EL 1985, 'Neuropsychiatric dysfunction in primary Sjogren's syndrome', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 344-350.
Malinow KL, Molina R, Gordon B, Selnes OA, Provost TT, Alexander EL. Neuropsychiatric dysfunction in primary Sjogren's syndrome. Annals of Internal Medicine. 1985;103(3):344-350.
Malinow, K. L. ; Molina, R. ; Gordon, Barry ; Selnes, O. A. ; Provost, T. T. ; Alexander, E. L. / Neuropsychiatric dysfunction in primary Sjogren's syndrome. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1985 ; Vol. 103, No. 3. pp. 344-350.
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