NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL AND NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL FUNCTION IN MERCURY-EXPOSED DENTISTS

Irving M. Shapiro, Austin J. Sumner, Lawrence K. Spitz, David R. Cornblath, Barbara Uzzell, Irwin I. Ship, Peter Bloch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a study of the relation between cumulative exposure to mercury and chronic health impairment 298 dentists had their mercury levels measured by an X-ray fluorescence technique. Electrodiagnostic and neuropsychological findings in the dentists with more than 20 μg/g tissue mercury levels were compared with those of a control group consisting of dentists with no detectable mercury levels. 30% of the 23 high mercury dentists had polyneuropathies. No polyneuropathies were detected in the control group. The high mercury group had mild visuographic dysfunction; they also had more symptom-distress than did the control group. These findings suggest that the use of mercury as a restorative material is a health risk for dentists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1147-1150
Number of pages4
JournalThe Lancet
Volume319
Issue number8282
DOIs
StatePublished - May 22 1982
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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