Neuropathological findings in a suspected case of childhood schizophrenia

M. F. Casanova, N. Carosella, Joel Kleinman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is the major dopaminergic (DA) center responsible for the innervation of the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and entorhinal region. These areas have been causally implicated in schizophrenia. Thus, the existence of brainstem pathology could explain many of the previously reported findings in schizophrenic (SC) patients. The authors focus on uncovering brainstem abnormalities in schizophrenia by studying the autopsied material of a patient having an early onset of symptomatology. The patient was evaluated at the age of 10 years for manneristic behavior, a speech disorder, and violence. Prominent auditory hallucinations became apparent years later. His mental status and ability for self-care steadily deteriorated until he succumbed to pneumonia at age 22. Microscopic examination of the brain showed central chromatolysis of neurons and mild gliosis in a restricted distribution of the brainstem and thalamus. Cell loss and cytoarchitectural disruption were evident in the frontal lobes, prepyriform cortex, and entorhinal region. The neuropathological changes were interpreted as a chronic derangement in the function of neurons of the rostral brainstem tegmental area and medial thalamus with secondary involvement of their terminal projection sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-319
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Childhood Schizophrenia
Brain Stem
Thalamus
Schizophrenia
Neurons
Speech Disorders
Ventral Tegmental Area
Aptitude
Gliosis
Hallucinations
Nucleus Accumbens
Frontal Lobe
Self Care
Prefrontal Cortex
Violence
Pneumonia
Pathology
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Neuropathological findings in a suspected case of childhood schizophrenia. / Casanova, M. F.; Carosella, N.; Kleinman, Joel.

In: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1990, p. 313-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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