Neuropathologic studies of the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging (BLSA)

Richard J. O'Brien, Susan M. Resnick, Alan B. Zonderman, Luigi Ferrucci, Barbara J. Crain, Olga Pletnikova, Gay Rudow, Diego Iacono, Miguel A. Riudavets, Ira Driscoll, Donald L. Price, Lee J Martin, Juan C Troncoso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) was established in 1958 and is one the oldest prospective studies of aging in the USA and the world. The BLSA is supported by the National Institute of Aging (NIA) and its mission is to learn what happens to people as they get old and how to sort out changes due to aging from those due to disease or other causes. In 1986, an autopsy program combined with comprehensive neurologic and cognitive evaluations was established in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC). Since then, 211 subjects have undergone autopsy. Here we review the key clinical neuropathological correlations from this autopsy series. The focus is on the morphological and biochemical changes that occur in normal aging, and the early neuropathological changes of neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). We highlight the combined clinical, pathologic, morphometric, and biochemical evidence of asymptomatic AD, a state characterized by normal clinical evaluations in subjects with abundant AD pathology. We conclude that in some individuals, successful cognitive aging results from compensatory mechanisms that occur at the neuronal level (i.e., neuronal hypertrophy and synaptic plasticity) whereas a failure of compensation may culminate in disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-675
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Baltimore
Longitudinal Studies
Alzheimer Disease
Autopsy
Neuronal Plasticity
Asymptomatic Diseases
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Hypertrophy
Nervous System
Prospective Studies
Pathology
Research

Keywords

  • α-synuclein
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyloid-β
  • Asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease
  • Dementia
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Stereology
  • Successful aging
  • Tau

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Neuropathologic studies of the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging (BLSA). / O'Brien, Richard J.; Resnick, Susan M.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Crain, Barbara J.; Pletnikova, Olga; Rudow, Gay; Iacono, Diego; Riudavets, Miguel A.; Driscoll, Ira; Price, Donald L.; Martin, Lee J; Troncoso, Juan C.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2009, p. 665-675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Brien, RJ, Resnick, SM, Zonderman, AB, Ferrucci, L, Crain, BJ, Pletnikova, O, Rudow, G, Iacono, D, Riudavets, MA, Driscoll, I, Price, DL, Martin, LJ & Troncoso, JC 2009, 'Neuropathologic studies of the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging (BLSA)', Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 665-675. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2009-1179
O'Brien, Richard J. ; Resnick, Susan M. ; Zonderman, Alan B. ; Ferrucci, Luigi ; Crain, Barbara J. ; Pletnikova, Olga ; Rudow, Gay ; Iacono, Diego ; Riudavets, Miguel A. ; Driscoll, Ira ; Price, Donald L. ; Martin, Lee J ; Troncoso, Juan C. / Neuropathologic studies of the Baltimore longitudinal study of aging (BLSA). In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 665-675.
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