Neuronal SIRT1 activation as a novel mechanism underlying the prevention of alzheimer disease amyloid neuropathology by calorie restriction

Weiping Qin, Tianle Yang, Lap Ho, Zhong Zhao, Jun Wang, Linghong Chen, Wei Zhao, Meenakshisundaram Thiyagarajan, Donal MacGrogan, Joseph T. Rodgers, Pere Puigserver, Junichi Sadoshima, Haiteng Deng, Steven Pedrini, Samuel Gandy, Anthony A. Sauve, Giulio M. Pasinetti

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide(NAD)+-dependent sirtuins have been identified to be key regulators in the lifespan extending effects of calorie restriction (CR) in a number of species. In this study we report for the first time that promotion of the NAD+-dependent sirtuin, SIRT1-mediated deacetylase activity, may be a mechanism by which CR influences Alzheimer disease (AD)-type amyloid neuropathology. Most importantly, we report that the predicted attenuation of β-amyloid content in the brain during CR can be reproduced in mouse neurons in vitro by manipulating cellular SIRT1 expression/activity through mechanisms involving the regulation of the serine/threonine Rho kinase ROCK1, known in part for its role in the inhibition of the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase processing of the amyloid precursor protein. Conversely, we found that the expression of constitutively active ROCK1 in vitro cultures significantly prevented SIRT1-mediated response, suggesting that α-secretase activity is required for SIRT1-mediated prevention of AD-type amyloid neuropathology. Consistently we found that the expression of exogenous human (h) SIRT1 in the brain of hSIRT1 transgenics also resulted in decreased ROCK1 expression and elevated α-secretase activity in vivo. These results demonstrate for the first time a role for SIRT1 activation in the brain as a novel mechanism through which CR may influence AD amyloid neuropathology. The study provides a potentially novel pharmacological strategy for AD prevention and/or treatment.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)21745-21754
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
    Volume281
    Issue number31
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 4 2006

    Fingerprint

    Amyloid
    Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases
    Alzheimer Disease
    Chemical activation
    Brain
    NAD
    Sirtuins
    rho-Associated Kinases
    Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor
    Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
    Threonine
    Serine
    Neurons
    Pharmacology
    Neuropathology
    Processing
    In Vitro Techniques

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry

    Cite this

    Neuronal SIRT1 activation as a novel mechanism underlying the prevention of alzheimer disease amyloid neuropathology by calorie restriction. / Qin, Weiping; Yang, Tianle; Ho, Lap; Zhao, Zhong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Linghong; Zhao, Wei; Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram; MacGrogan, Donal; Rodgers, Joseph T.; Puigserver, Pere; Sadoshima, Junichi; Deng, Haiteng; Pedrini, Steven; Gandy, Samuel; Sauve, Anthony A.; Pasinetti, Giulio M.

    In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 281, No. 31, 04.08.2006, p. 21745-21754.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Qin, W, Yang, T, Ho, L, Zhao, Z, Wang, J, Chen, L, Zhao, W, Thiyagarajan, M, MacGrogan, D, Rodgers, JT, Puigserver, P, Sadoshima, J, Deng, H, Pedrini, S, Gandy, S, Sauve, AA & Pasinetti, GM 2006, 'Neuronal SIRT1 activation as a novel mechanism underlying the prevention of alzheimer disease amyloid neuropathology by calorie restriction', Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 281, no. 31, pp. 21745-21754. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M602909200
    Qin, Weiping ; Yang, Tianle ; Ho, Lap ; Zhao, Zhong ; Wang, Jun ; Chen, Linghong ; Zhao, Wei ; Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram ; MacGrogan, Donal ; Rodgers, Joseph T. ; Puigserver, Pere ; Sadoshima, Junichi ; Deng, Haiteng ; Pedrini, Steven ; Gandy, Samuel ; Sauve, Anthony A. ; Pasinetti, Giulio M. / Neuronal SIRT1 activation as a novel mechanism underlying the prevention of alzheimer disease amyloid neuropathology by calorie restriction. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2006 ; Vol. 281, No. 31. pp. 21745-21754.
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    AU - Thiyagarajan, Meenakshisundaram

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