Neuronal plasticity in the afferent visual system - I. Effect of flicker stimulation on responses of retinal and geniculate units in the cat

CS Adorjani, Joachim R Von Der Heydt, G. Baumgartner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effect of long lasting flicker stimulation on the excitatory responses of single units in the optic tract (OT), and the lateral geniculate body (LGB) of cat, was analysed with respect to changes in response strength. ON- and OFF-center units were stimulated with periodic light increments and decrements, respectively, in the receptive field center (RFC). OT units were classified into phasic and tonic, LGB units into phasic, tonic and intermediate, according to their response to a 500 msec stimulus. During the first 30 seconds of 1-Hz flicker stimulation, all OT units and over 90% of the LGB units exhibited a progressive decrease of their responses to roughly half the initial magnitude. The decay was significantly steeper in LGB units than in OT units. Trend analysis of the later responses (after 30 sec) revealed a further slow decrease in tonic LGB units, amounting to 20% in 10 minutes, but not in OT units. The recovery after 10 min of flicker stimulation took about 2-5 min. No systematic difference in the time course of responses was found between ON- and OFF-center units and between the phasic and tonic OT units. Part of the phasic and intermediate LGB units (about 20% of all LGB units) behaved differently in terms of fast habituation of a response component. The influence of intensity, frequency, and mode (increment or decrement) of stimulation was studied, leading to the conclusion that changes in light adaptation alone cannot account for the findings. The stronger decay of LGB units relative to the OT output is discussed either on the basis of passive, intrinsic geniculate processes (tonic units), or in terms of active, acculumating hyperpolarizing activity (phasic and intermediate units).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-146
Number of pages30
JournalPsychological Research
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Geniculate Bodies
Neuronal Plasticity
Cats
Ocular Adaptation
Plasticity
Stimulation
Optic Tract
Optics
Tonic
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Neuronal plasticity in the afferent visual system - I. Effect of flicker stimulation on responses of retinal and geniculate units in the cat. / Adorjani, CS; Von Der Heydt, Joachim R; Baumgartner, G.

In: Psychological Research, Vol. 38, No. 2, 06.1975, p. 117-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cd510b47fd1d4131a238f92e55aaa639,
title = "Neuronal plasticity in the afferent visual system - I. Effect of flicker stimulation on responses of retinal and geniculate units in the cat",
abstract = "The effect of long lasting flicker stimulation on the excitatory responses of single units in the optic tract (OT), and the lateral geniculate body (LGB) of cat, was analysed with respect to changes in response strength. ON- and OFF-center units were stimulated with periodic light increments and decrements, respectively, in the receptive field center (RFC). OT units were classified into phasic and tonic, LGB units into phasic, tonic and intermediate, according to their response to a 500 msec stimulus. During the first 30 seconds of 1-Hz flicker stimulation, all OT units and over 90{\%} of the LGB units exhibited a progressive decrease of their responses to roughly half the initial magnitude. The decay was significantly steeper in LGB units than in OT units. Trend analysis of the later responses (after 30 sec) revealed a further slow decrease in tonic LGB units, amounting to 20{\%} in 10 minutes, but not in OT units. The recovery after 10 min of flicker stimulation took about 2-5 min. No systematic difference in the time course of responses was found between ON- and OFF-center units and between the phasic and tonic OT units. Part of the phasic and intermediate LGB units (about 20{\%} of all LGB units) behaved differently in terms of fast habituation of a response component. The influence of intensity, frequency, and mode (increment or decrement) of stimulation was studied, leading to the conclusion that changes in light adaptation alone cannot account for the findings. The stronger decay of LGB units relative to the OT output is discussed either on the basis of passive, intrinsic geniculate processes (tonic units), or in terms of active, acculumating hyperpolarizing activity (phasic and intermediate units).",
author = "CS Adorjani and {Von Der Heydt}, {Joachim R} and G. Baumgartner",
year = "1975",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/BF00308521",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "117--146",
journal = "Psychological Research",
issn = "0340-0727",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuronal plasticity in the afferent visual system - I. Effect of flicker stimulation on responses of retinal and geniculate units in the cat

AU - Adorjani, CS

AU - Von Der Heydt, Joachim R

AU - Baumgartner, G.

PY - 1975/6

Y1 - 1975/6

N2 - The effect of long lasting flicker stimulation on the excitatory responses of single units in the optic tract (OT), and the lateral geniculate body (LGB) of cat, was analysed with respect to changes in response strength. ON- and OFF-center units were stimulated with periodic light increments and decrements, respectively, in the receptive field center (RFC). OT units were classified into phasic and tonic, LGB units into phasic, tonic and intermediate, according to their response to a 500 msec stimulus. During the first 30 seconds of 1-Hz flicker stimulation, all OT units and over 90% of the LGB units exhibited a progressive decrease of their responses to roughly half the initial magnitude. The decay was significantly steeper in LGB units than in OT units. Trend analysis of the later responses (after 30 sec) revealed a further slow decrease in tonic LGB units, amounting to 20% in 10 minutes, but not in OT units. The recovery after 10 min of flicker stimulation took about 2-5 min. No systematic difference in the time course of responses was found between ON- and OFF-center units and between the phasic and tonic OT units. Part of the phasic and intermediate LGB units (about 20% of all LGB units) behaved differently in terms of fast habituation of a response component. The influence of intensity, frequency, and mode (increment or decrement) of stimulation was studied, leading to the conclusion that changes in light adaptation alone cannot account for the findings. The stronger decay of LGB units relative to the OT output is discussed either on the basis of passive, intrinsic geniculate processes (tonic units), or in terms of active, acculumating hyperpolarizing activity (phasic and intermediate units).

AB - The effect of long lasting flicker stimulation on the excitatory responses of single units in the optic tract (OT), and the lateral geniculate body (LGB) of cat, was analysed with respect to changes in response strength. ON- and OFF-center units were stimulated with periodic light increments and decrements, respectively, in the receptive field center (RFC). OT units were classified into phasic and tonic, LGB units into phasic, tonic and intermediate, according to their response to a 500 msec stimulus. During the first 30 seconds of 1-Hz flicker stimulation, all OT units and over 90% of the LGB units exhibited a progressive decrease of their responses to roughly half the initial magnitude. The decay was significantly steeper in LGB units than in OT units. Trend analysis of the later responses (after 30 sec) revealed a further slow decrease in tonic LGB units, amounting to 20% in 10 minutes, but not in OT units. The recovery after 10 min of flicker stimulation took about 2-5 min. No systematic difference in the time course of responses was found between ON- and OFF-center units and between the phasic and tonic OT units. Part of the phasic and intermediate LGB units (about 20% of all LGB units) behaved differently in terms of fast habituation of a response component. The influence of intensity, frequency, and mode (increment or decrement) of stimulation was studied, leading to the conclusion that changes in light adaptation alone cannot account for the findings. The stronger decay of LGB units relative to the OT output is discussed either on the basis of passive, intrinsic geniculate processes (tonic units), or in terms of active, acculumating hyperpolarizing activity (phasic and intermediate units).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0016856634&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0016856634&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF00308521

DO - 10.1007/BF00308521

M3 - Article

C2 - 1226412

AN - SCOPUS:0016856634

VL - 38

SP - 117

EP - 146

JO - Psychological Research

JF - Psychological Research

SN - 0340-0727

IS - 2

ER -