Neuronal injury in hippocampus with human immunodeficiency virus transactivating protein, Tat

W. F. Maragos, P. Tillman, Melina Jones, A. J. Bruce-Keller, S. Roth, J. E. Bell, A. Nath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection may develop a dementing illness. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we investigated the susceptibility of the hippocampal formation to the Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus. We also determined the pattern of hippocampal injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. Following exposure of hippocampal slices to Tat, marked susceptibility of CA3 region with relative insensitivity of the CA1/2 region was observed. Injection of Tat into different regions of the rat hippocampus produced similar neuronal loss in both CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. In animals administered Tat, lesions were dose-dependent and immunohistochemical staining showed marked gliosis and loss of microtubule associated protein-2 in the affected areas at 3 days post-injection. Interestingly, synaptophysin staining was relatively preserved. In hippocampal tissue from patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis, loss of microtubule-associated protein-2 staining was reduced in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. The results of our experiments demonstrate a unique pattern of hippocampal injury in organotypic culture and rats exposed to Tat. Our observations that patients with human immunodeficiency virus reveal a similar pattern of damage suggests that Tat protein may be pathophysiological relevant in human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-53
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroscience
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 17 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Proteins
Hippocampus
HIV
Wounds and Injuries
Encephalitis
tat Gene Products
Microtubule-Associated Proteins
Dentate Gyrus
Staining and Labeling
Synaptophysin
Injections
Gliosis
Virus Diseases

Keywords

  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
  • Dementia
  • Microtubule associated protein-2
  • Neurotoxin
  • Silane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Maragos, W. F., Tillman, P., Jones, M., Bruce-Keller, A. J., Roth, S., Bell, J. E., & Nath, A. (2003). Neuronal injury in hippocampus with human immunodeficiency virus transactivating protein, Tat. Neuroscience, 117(1), 43-53. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4522(02)00713-3

Neuronal injury in hippocampus with human immunodeficiency virus transactivating protein, Tat. / Maragos, W. F.; Tillman, P.; Jones, Melina; Bruce-Keller, A. J.; Roth, S.; Bell, J. E.; Nath, A.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 117, No. 1, 17.03.2003, p. 43-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maragos, WF, Tillman, P, Jones, M, Bruce-Keller, AJ, Roth, S, Bell, JE & Nath, A 2003, 'Neuronal injury in hippocampus with human immunodeficiency virus transactivating protein, Tat', Neuroscience, vol. 117, no. 1, pp. 43-53. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4522(02)00713-3
Maragos, W. F. ; Tillman, P. ; Jones, Melina ; Bruce-Keller, A. J. ; Roth, S. ; Bell, J. E. ; Nath, A. / Neuronal injury in hippocampus with human immunodeficiency virus transactivating protein, Tat. In: Neuroscience. 2003 ; Vol. 117, No. 1. pp. 43-53.
@article{2217eabc9c814a09997b260808c21bce,
title = "Neuronal injury in hippocampus with human immunodeficiency virus transactivating protein, Tat",
abstract = "Patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection may develop a dementing illness. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we investigated the susceptibility of the hippocampal formation to the Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus. We also determined the pattern of hippocampal injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. Following exposure of hippocampal slices to Tat, marked susceptibility of CA3 region with relative insensitivity of the CA1/2 region was observed. Injection of Tat into different regions of the rat hippocampus produced similar neuronal loss in both CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. In animals administered Tat, lesions were dose-dependent and immunohistochemical staining showed marked gliosis and loss of microtubule associated protein-2 in the affected areas at 3 days post-injection. Interestingly, synaptophysin staining was relatively preserved. In hippocampal tissue from patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis, loss of microtubule-associated protein-2 staining was reduced in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. The results of our experiments demonstrate a unique pattern of hippocampal injury in organotypic culture and rats exposed to Tat. Our observations that patients with human immunodeficiency virus reveal a similar pattern of damage suggests that Tat protein may be pathophysiological relevant in human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis.",
keywords = "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, Dementia, Microtubule associated protein-2, Neurotoxin, Silane",
author = "Maragos, {W. F.} and P. Tillman and Melina Jones and Bruce-Keller, {A. J.} and S. Roth and Bell, {J. E.} and A. Nath",
year = "2003",
month = "3",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1016/S0306-4522(02)00713-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "117",
pages = "43--53",
journal = "Neuroscience",
issn = "0306-4522",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuronal injury in hippocampus with human immunodeficiency virus transactivating protein, Tat

AU - Maragos, W. F.

AU - Tillman, P.

AU - Jones, Melina

AU - Bruce-Keller, A. J.

AU - Roth, S.

AU - Bell, J. E.

AU - Nath, A.

PY - 2003/3/17

Y1 - 2003/3/17

N2 - Patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection may develop a dementing illness. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we investigated the susceptibility of the hippocampal formation to the Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus. We also determined the pattern of hippocampal injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. Following exposure of hippocampal slices to Tat, marked susceptibility of CA3 region with relative insensitivity of the CA1/2 region was observed. Injection of Tat into different regions of the rat hippocampus produced similar neuronal loss in both CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. In animals administered Tat, lesions were dose-dependent and immunohistochemical staining showed marked gliosis and loss of microtubule associated protein-2 in the affected areas at 3 days post-injection. Interestingly, synaptophysin staining was relatively preserved. In hippocampal tissue from patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis, loss of microtubule-associated protein-2 staining was reduced in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. The results of our experiments demonstrate a unique pattern of hippocampal injury in organotypic culture and rats exposed to Tat. Our observations that patients with human immunodeficiency virus reveal a similar pattern of damage suggests that Tat protein may be pathophysiological relevant in human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis.

AB - Patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection may develop a dementing illness. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we investigated the susceptibility of the hippocampal formation to the Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus. We also determined the pattern of hippocampal injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. Following exposure of hippocampal slices to Tat, marked susceptibility of CA3 region with relative insensitivity of the CA1/2 region was observed. Injection of Tat into different regions of the rat hippocampus produced similar neuronal loss in both CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. In animals administered Tat, lesions were dose-dependent and immunohistochemical staining showed marked gliosis and loss of microtubule associated protein-2 in the affected areas at 3 days post-injection. Interestingly, synaptophysin staining was relatively preserved. In hippocampal tissue from patients with human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis, loss of microtubule-associated protein-2 staining was reduced in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. The results of our experiments demonstrate a unique pattern of hippocampal injury in organotypic culture and rats exposed to Tat. Our observations that patients with human immunodeficiency virus reveal a similar pattern of damage suggests that Tat protein may be pathophysiological relevant in human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis.

KW - Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

KW - Dementia

KW - Microtubule associated protein-2

KW - Neurotoxin

KW - Silane

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037451775&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037451775&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0306-4522(02)00713-3

DO - 10.1016/S0306-4522(02)00713-3

M3 - Article

VL - 117

SP - 43

EP - 53

JO - Neuroscience

JF - Neuroscience

SN - 0306-4522

IS - 1

ER -