Neuronal common input strength is unidentifiable from average firing rates and synchrony

Daniel Jeck, Ernst Niebur

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Observing firing rates of neurons and the level of synchrony between them is a common technique to draw conclusions on the micro-circuitry of the neuronal network they are embedded in, and on the input they receive from other stages of the nervous system. These questions are obviously of great importance for understanding the nature of neural coding. Using a very simple model network of leaky integrate and fire neurons that receive a mixture of common and independent inputs, we show that separating a synchrony code from a firing rate code from measurements of average spike counts and spike-spike synchrony is mathematically impossible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 49th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781479984282
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2015
Event2015 49th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2015 - Baltimore, United States
Duration: Mar 18 2015Mar 20 2015

Publication series

Name2015 49th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2015

Other

Other2015 49th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2015
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore
Period3/18/153/20/15

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems

Cite this

Jeck, D., & Niebur, E. (2015). Neuronal common input strength is unidentifiable from average firing rates and synchrony. In 2015 49th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2015 [7086907] (2015 49th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2015). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/CISS.2015.7086907