Neuromodulation in Pediatrics: Case Series

Eugene Kim, Sean Gamble, Adina Schwartz, Giovanni Cucchiaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Neuromodulation, particularly intrathecal drug delivery systems and spinal cord stimulators, can be a valuable tool when treating chronic pain in adults. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding its use in pediatrics. Materials: and Methods: We present a series of 14 children and adolescents with intractable pain who received a spinal cord stimulator or a pump for the intrathecal delivery of medications between 2010 and 2016 at our institution. Results: During the study period, we placed 10 intrathecal pumps and 4 spinal cord stimulators with an average age of 17 years old. Pain scores significantly improved after the implant (P<0.007) and function improved in 79% of patients. Opioid use was also significantly reduced. Three patients eventually had their device removed due to psychiatric comorbidities. Four patients had complications that were treated without further sequelae. Conclusion: Neuromodulation can offer important options in treating some pediatric chronic pain patients. In-depth knowledge of primary disease and strict patient selection in the context of the patient’s social situation is vital to successful treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 22 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • case series
  • intrathecal drug delivery
  • outcomes
  • pediatric patients
  • spinal cord stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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