Neuroimaging variables related to development of Secondary Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder after closed head injury in children and adolescents

Joan Gerring, Kathleen Brady, Anita Chen, Cynthia Quinn, Edward Herskovits, Karen Bandeen-Roche, Martha B. Denckla, R. N. Bryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To characterize children who develop Secondary Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (S-ADHD) after severe and moderate closed head injury (CHI) according to neuroimaging variables. Method: Ninety-nine children from 4-19 years who suffered severe and moderate CHI were prospectively followed for a year after injury. Premorbid psychiatric status was determined by administration to the parent of a structured psychiatric interview. This interview was readministered 1 year after injury to determine the presence of post-closed head injury S-ADHD. An MRI was performed 3 months after injury to define lesion locations and volumes. Results: A set of multiple logistic regression models determined that the odds of developing S-ADHD were 3.64 times higher among children with thalamus injury, and 3.15 times higher among children with basal ganglia injury. There was no significant difference in lesion volumes in any of the locations of interest between the group who developed S-ADHD and the group who did not develop S-ADHD. Conclusion: The data support an association between S-ADHD and injury in either or both the thalamus and basal ganglia, but they do not definitively demonstrate whether injury in either structure has an effect on S-ADHD in the absence of injury in the other.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-218
Number of pages14
JournalBrain Injury
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2000
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

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