Neurodevelopmental and medical outcomes of persistent pulmonary hypertension in term newborns treated with nitric oxide

Paul H. Lipkin, Dennis Davidson, Lynn Spivak, Richard Straube, Jared Rhines, C. T. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine the medical and neurodevelopmental outcome of children with moderately severe persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) treated with or without inhaled nitric oxide (I-NO). Study design: Term infants with PPHN and a baseline oxygenation index of 24 ± 9 at study entry were randomly assigned to early treatment with placebo or initial doses of I-NO (5, 20, and 80 ppm). Outcome was measured at ∼1 year by frequency of hospitalization, growth, and neurodevelopmental and audiologic evaluation. Results: Of 155 children enrolled, 144 survived, and there was follow-up for 133. No significant differences between the placebo and the I-NO groups were seen in any long-term outcome. Rehospitalization occurred in 22%, and growth did not differ. The composite neurodevelopment and audiologic outcome showed impairment in 46% of the infants. There were major neurologic abnormalities in 13%, cognitive delays in 30%, and hearing loss in 19% of the infants. Conclusions: Moderately severe PPHN at 24 hours after birth is associated with high rates of rehospitalization and disability at 1 year. Adverse outcomes were the same in I-NO and control groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-310
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume140
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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