Neurobiology of exercise

Rod K. Dishman, Hans Rudolf Berthoud, Frank W. Booth, Carl W. Cotman, V. Reggie Edgerton, Monika R. Fleshner, Simon C. Gandevia, Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, Benjamin N. Greenwood, Charles H. Hillman, Arthur F. Kramer, Barry E. Levin, Timothy H Moran, Amelia A. Russo-Neustadt, John D. Salamone, Jacqueline D. Van Hoomissen, Charles E. Wade, David A. York, Michael J. Zigmond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Voluntary physical activity and exercise training can favorably influence brain plasticity by facilitating neurogenerative, neuroadaptive, and neuroprotective processes. At least some of the processes are mediated by neurotrophic factors. Motor skill training and regular exercise enhance executive functions of cognition and some types of learning, including motor learning in the spinal cord. These adaptations in the central nervous system have implications for the prevention and treatment of obesity, cancer, depression, the decline in cognition associated with aging, and neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, ischemic stroke, and head and spinal cord injury. Chronic voluntary physical activity also attenuates neural responses to stress in brain circuits responsible for regulating peripheral sympathetic activity, suggesting constraint on sympathetic responses to stress that could plausibly contribute to reductions in clinical disorders such as hypertension, heart failure, oxidative stress, and suppression of immunity. Mechanisms explaining these adaptations are not as yet known, but metabolic and neurochemical pathways among skeletal muscle, the spinal cord, and the brain offer plausible, testable mechanisms that might help explain effects of physical activity and exercise on the central nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-356
Number of pages12
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

Neurobiology
Exercise
Cognition
Spinal Cord
Brain
Central Nervous System
Learning
Motor Skills
Executive Function
Nerve Growth Factors
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Nervous System Diseases
Spinal Cord Injuries
Parkinson Disease
Immunity
Alzheimer Disease
Skeletal Muscle
Oxidative Stress
Heart Failure
Obesity

Keywords

  • Brain and behavior
  • Energy balance
  • Neural plasticity
  • Neurotrophins
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Dishman, R. K., Berthoud, H. R., Booth, F. W., Cotman, C. W., Edgerton, V. R., Fleshner, M. R., ... Zigmond, M. J. (2006). Neurobiology of exercise. Obesity, 14(3), 345-356. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.46

Neurobiology of exercise. / Dishman, Rod K.; Berthoud, Hans Rudolf; Booth, Frank W.; Cotman, Carl W.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Fleshner, Monika R.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Hillman, Charles H.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Levin, Barry E.; Moran, Timothy H; Russo-Neustadt, Amelia A.; Salamone, John D.; Van Hoomissen, Jacqueline D.; Wade, Charles E.; York, David A.; Zigmond, Michael J.

In: Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 345-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dishman, RK, Berthoud, HR, Booth, FW, Cotman, CW, Edgerton, VR, Fleshner, MR, Gandevia, SC, Gomez-Pinilla, F, Greenwood, BN, Hillman, CH, Kramer, AF, Levin, BE, Moran, TH, Russo-Neustadt, AA, Salamone, JD, Van Hoomissen, JD, Wade, CE, York, DA & Zigmond, MJ 2006, 'Neurobiology of exercise', Obesity, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 345-356. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.46
Dishman RK, Berthoud HR, Booth FW, Cotman CW, Edgerton VR, Fleshner MR et al. Neurobiology of exercise. Obesity. 2006 Mar;14(3):345-356. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.46
Dishman, Rod K. ; Berthoud, Hans Rudolf ; Booth, Frank W. ; Cotman, Carl W. ; Edgerton, V. Reggie ; Fleshner, Monika R. ; Gandevia, Simon C. ; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando ; Greenwood, Benjamin N. ; Hillman, Charles H. ; Kramer, Arthur F. ; Levin, Barry E. ; Moran, Timothy H ; Russo-Neustadt, Amelia A. ; Salamone, John D. ; Van Hoomissen, Jacqueline D. ; Wade, Charles E. ; York, David A. ; Zigmond, Michael J. / Neurobiology of exercise. In: Obesity. 2006 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 345-356.
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