Neurobiological factors underlying psychosocial moderators of childhood stress and trauma

Fatih Ozbay, Vansh Sharma, Joan Kaufman, Bruce McEwen, Dennis Charney, Steven Southwick

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses resilience as a psychological construct, and describes some of the neurobiological and psychosocial features that are believed to characterize stress-resilient individuals. It reviews the current understanding regarding the neurobiology of stress resilience, including neurocircuitry, neurochemistry and the role of gene-environment interactions. The chapter deals with a consideration of information-processing theory and a discussion of the neurobiological basis of social support in the development of stress resilience. The neurocircuitry of stress resilience consists of a variety of brain structures intimately involved in mediating the stress response, including the amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Gene-environment interactions, as typified by the diathesis-stress model of illness, are important factors in the development of stress resilience. Different forms of social support have been shown to play a role in the development of stress resilience and in reversing stress-related adverse changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease
Subtitle of host publicationThe Hidden Epidemic
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages189-199
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9780511777042
ISBN (Print)9780521880268
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Ozbay, F., Sharma, V., Kaufman, J., McEwen, B., Charney, D., & Southwick, S. (2010). Neurobiological factors underlying psychosocial moderators of childhood stress and trauma. In The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease: The Hidden Epidemic (pp. 189-199). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511777042.022