Neurobehavioral outcomes in children after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Beth S. Slomine, Faye S. Silverstein, James R. Christensen, Richard Holubkov, Kent Page, J. Michael Dean, Frank W. Moler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study examined 12-month neurobehavioral outcomes in children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OH-CA), were comatose after resuscitation, and were enrolled in a clinical trial to evaluate targeted temperature management to hypothermia (33.0°C) or normothermia (36.8°C) (Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest, Out-of-Hopsital [THAPCA-OH]; NCT00878644). Methods: Baseline functioning was assessed by caregiver responses on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Second Edition (VABS-II) soon after OH-CA (based on functioning before OH-CA); children with broadly normal baseline functioning (VABS-II ≥70) were included in the THAPCA-OH primary outcome. VABS-II was completed again 12 months later. Then, face-to-face cognitive evaluations were completed. Analyses evaluated changes in VABS-II composite, domain, and subdomain scores and cognitive functioning at follow-up. Results: Ninety-six of 295 enrolled children were alive at 12 months; 87 of 96 had broadly normal baseline functioning (VABS-II ≥70). Follow-up was obtained on 85/87. Forty-two of 85 had VABS-II ≥70 at 12 months. VABS-II composite, domain, and subdomain scores declined significantly between baseline and 12-month follow-up (P <.001). Declines were greatest in older children. Most children displayed well below average cognitive functioning. Older age at cardiac arrest and higher baseline VABS-II scores were predictive of greater decline in neurobehavioral function. Treatment with hypothermia did not influence neurobehavioral outcomes. Conclusions: This is the largest study exploring long-term neurobehavioral outcomes in children surviving OH-CA who were comatose after resuscitation. Results revealed significant neurobehavioral morbidity across multiple functional domains, based both on caregiver reports and performance on Objective cognitive measures, in survivors 1 year later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume137
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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