Neural substrates underlying vestibular compensation: Contribution of peripheral versus central processing

Kathleen E. Cullen, Lloyd B. Minor, Mathieu Beraneck, Soroush G. Sadeghi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which functions to stabilize gaze and ensure clear vision during everyday activities, shows impressive adaptation in response to environmental requirements. In particular, the VOR exhibits remarkable recovery following the loss of unilateral labyrinthine input as a result of injury or disease. The relative simplicity of the pathways that mediate the VOR, make it an excellent model system for understanding the changes (learning) that occur in the brain following peripheral vestibular loss to yield adaptive changes. This mini review considers the findings of behavioral, single unit recording and lesion studies of VOR compensation. Recent experiments have provided evidence that the brain makes use of multiple plasticity mechanisms (i.e., changes in peripheral as well as central processing) during the course of vestibular compensation to accomplish the sensory-motor transformations required to accurately guide behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-182
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation
Volume19
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

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