Neural networks essential for naming and word comprehension

Melissa Newhart, Lynda Ken, Jonathan T. Kleinman, Jennifer Heidler-Gary, Argye Hillis-Trupe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lesion/deficit association studies of aphasia commonly focus on one brain region as primarily responsible for a particular language deficit. However, functional imaging and some lesion studies indicate that multiple brain regions are likely necessary for any language task. We tested 156 acute stroke patients on basic language tasks (naming and spoken and written word comprehension) and magnetic resonance diffusion and perfusion imaging to determine the relative contributions of various brain regions to each task. Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated that the error rate on each task was best predicted by dysfunction in several perisylvian regions, with both common and distinct regions for the 3 tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-30
Number of pages6
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Neurology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Fingerprint

Language
Brain
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Aphasia
Linear Models
Stroke
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Acute stroke
  • Anomia
  • Aphasia
  • Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Neural networks essential for naming and word comprehension. / Newhart, Melissa; Ken, Lynda; Kleinman, Jonathan T.; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer; Hillis-Trupe, Argye.

In: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 03.2007, p. 25-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newhart, Melissa ; Ken, Lynda ; Kleinman, Jonathan T. ; Heidler-Gary, Jennifer ; Hillis-Trupe, Argye. / Neural networks essential for naming and word comprehension. In: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology. 2007 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 25-30.
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