Net endogenous acid production is associated with a faster decline in GFR in African Americans

Julia J. Scialla, Lawrence Appel, Brad C. Astor, Edgar R Miller, Srinivasan Beddhu, Mark Woodward, Rulan S. Parekh, Cheryl A M Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increased acid excretion may promote renal injury. To evaluate this in African Americans with hypertensive nephrosclerosis, we studied the association between the net endogenous acid production and progression of kidney disease in 632 patients in the AASK trial. Protein and potassium intakes were estimated from 24 h urea nitrogen and potassium excretion, and used to estimate net endogenous acid production, averaged over 2 years, approximating routine intake. The link between net endogenous acid production and the I 125iothalamate glomerular filtration rate (iGFR) and time to end-stage renal disease or doubling of serum creatinine was analyzed using mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regressions. The trend in higher net endogenous acid production was significantly associated with a faster decline in iGFR over a median of 3.2 years. After adjustment for age, body mass index, baseline iGFR, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and randomized treatment group, the trend in higher net endogenous acid production remained significantly associated with a faster decline in iGFR at a rate of 1.01 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 per year faster in the highest compared to the lowest quartile. However, in time-to-event analyses over a median of 7.7 years, the adjusted hazard ratio (1.10) for composite renal events per 25 mEq/day higher net endogenous acid production was not significant. Hence, our findings implicate endogenous acid production as a potential modifiable risk factor for progressive kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-112
Number of pages7
JournalKidney International
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

African Americans
Acids
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Kidney Diseases
Creatinine
Potassium
Nephrosclerosis
Kidney
Proportional Hazards Models
Chronic Kidney Failure
Urea
Proteins
Body Mass Index
Nitrogen
Urine
Wounds and Injuries
Serum

Keywords

  • AASK (African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension)
  • acidosis
  • chronic kidney disease
  • nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Net endogenous acid production is associated with a faster decline in GFR in African Americans. / Scialla, Julia J.; Appel, Lawrence; Astor, Brad C.; Miller, Edgar R; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Woodward, Mark; Parekh, Rulan S.; Anderson, Cheryl A M.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 82, No. 1, 01.07.2012, p. 106-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scialla, JJ, Appel, L, Astor, BC, Miller, ER, Beddhu, S, Woodward, M, Parekh, RS & Anderson, CAM 2012, 'Net endogenous acid production is associated with a faster decline in GFR in African Americans', Kidney International, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 106-112. https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2012.82
Scialla, Julia J. ; Appel, Lawrence ; Astor, Brad C. ; Miller, Edgar R ; Beddhu, Srinivasan ; Woodward, Mark ; Parekh, Rulan S. ; Anderson, Cheryl A M. / Net endogenous acid production is associated with a faster decline in GFR in African Americans. In: Kidney International. 2012 ; Vol. 82, No. 1. pp. 106-112.
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