Nerve conduction studies and sensibility testing in carpal tunnel syndrome

Henry A. Spindler, A. Lee Dellon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper compares the results of detailed sensibility testing with nerve conduction studies done in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Forty-three patients with 74 symptomatic hands were examined. Median and ulnar distal sensory and motor latencies were obtained bilaterally. Sensibility testing included assessment of perception of vibratory stimuli, classic two-point discrimination, and moving two-point discrimination. Comparison of the results were made in the overall group of patients, and patients were also grouped according to the severity of symptoms. In the 74 hands, nerve conduction studies were abnormal in 81 % and sensory examination was abnormal in 66%, for an overall combined abnormality rate of 92%. In the most severely involved hands, both nerve conduction and sensory testing were abnormal in approximately 80%. However, in the least severely involved group, nerve conduction studies were abnormal in 80%, while sensory examination was abnormal in only 10%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-263
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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