Neonatal Mortality Risk Associated with Preterm Birth in East Africa, Adjusted by Weight for Gestational Age: Individual Participant Level Meta-Analysis

Tanya Marchant, Barbara Willey, Joanne Katz, Siân Clarke, Simon Kariuki, Feiko ter Kuile, John Lusingu, Richard Ndyomugyenyi, Christentze Schmiegelow, Deborah Watson-Jones, Joanna Armstrong Schellenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Low birth weight and prematurity are amongst the strongest predictors of neonatal death. However, the extent to which they act independently is poorly understood. Our objective was to estimate the neonatal mortality risk associated with preterm birth when stratified by weight for gestational age in the high mortality setting of East Africa. Methods and Findings: Members and collaborators of the Malaria and the MARCH Centers, at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, were contacted and protocols reviewed for East African studies that measured (1) birth weight, (2) gestational age at birth using antenatal ultrasound or neonatal assessment, and (3) neonatal mortality. Ten datasets were identified and four met the inclusion criteria. The four datasets (from Uganda, Kenya, and two from Tanzania) contained 5,727 births recorded between 1999-2010. 4,843 births had complete outcome data and were included in an individual participant level meta-analysis. 99% of 445 low birth weight (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1001292
JournalPLoS Medicine
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

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Eastern Africa
Premature Birth
Infant Mortality
Gestational Age
Meta-Analysis
Low Birth Weight Infant
Parturition
Weights and Measures
Tropical Medicine
Uganda
Tanzania
Kenya
Hygiene
Birth Weight
Malaria
Mortality
Datasets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Neonatal Mortality Risk Associated with Preterm Birth in East Africa, Adjusted by Weight for Gestational Age : Individual Participant Level Meta-Analysis. / Marchant, Tanya; Willey, Barbara; Katz, Joanne; Clarke, Siân; Kariuki, Simon; ter Kuile, Feiko; Lusingu, John; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Schmiegelow, Christentze; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Armstrong Schellenberg, Joanna.

In: PLoS Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 8, e1001292, 08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marchant, T, Willey, B, Katz, J, Clarke, S, Kariuki, S, ter Kuile, F, Lusingu, J, Ndyomugyenyi, R, Schmiegelow, C, Watson-Jones, D & Armstrong Schellenberg, J 2012, 'Neonatal Mortality Risk Associated with Preterm Birth in East Africa, Adjusted by Weight for Gestational Age: Individual Participant Level Meta-Analysis', PLoS Medicine, vol. 9, no. 8, e1001292. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001292
Marchant, Tanya ; Willey, Barbara ; Katz, Joanne ; Clarke, Siân ; Kariuki, Simon ; ter Kuile, Feiko ; Lusingu, John ; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard ; Schmiegelow, Christentze ; Watson-Jones, Deborah ; Armstrong Schellenberg, Joanna. / Neonatal Mortality Risk Associated with Preterm Birth in East Africa, Adjusted by Weight for Gestational Age : Individual Participant Level Meta-Analysis. In: PLoS Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 9, No. 8.
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