Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation: A pilot study describing a new method for treating infected wounds

Allen Gabriel, Jaimie T Shores, Cherrie Heinrich, Waheed Baqai, Sharon Kalina, Norman Sogioka, Subhas Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This data review reports the results of 15 patients who were treated with Vacuum-Assisted Closure® (VAC) negative pressure therapy system in addition to the timed, intermittent delivery of an instilled topical solution for management of their complex, infected wounds. Prospective data for 15 patients treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)-instillation was recorded and analysed. Primary endpoints were compared to a retrospective control group of 15 patients treated with our institution's standard moist wound-care therapy. Culture-specific systemic antibiotics were prescribed as per specific patient need in both groups. All data were checked for normality of distribution and equality of variance and appropriate parametric and non parametric analyses were conducted. Compared with the standard moist wound-care therapy control group, patients in the NPWT-instillation group required fewer days of treatment (36.5 ± 13.1 versus 9.9 ± 4.3 days, P <0.001), cleared of clinical infection earlier (25.9 ± 6.6 versus 6.0 ± 1.5 days, P <0.001), had wounds close earlier (29.6 ± 6.5 versus 13.2 ± 6.8 days, P <0.001) and had fewer in-hospital stay days (39.2 ± 12.1 versus 14.7 ± 9.2 days, P <0.001). In this pilot study, NPWT instillation showed a significant decrease in the mean time to bioburden reduction, wound closure and hospital discharge compared with traditional wet-to-moist wound care. Outcomes from this study analysis suggest that the use of NPWT instillation may reduce cost and decrease inpatient care requirements for these complex, infected wounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-413
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Wound Journal
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Wounds and Injuries
Health Facility Closure
Control Groups
Therapeutics
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pressure
Costs and Cost Analysis
Infection

Keywords

  • Instillation
  • Negative pressure wound therapy
  • Silver nitrate
  • Vacuum-assisted closure therapy
  • Wound-care infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation : A pilot study describing a new method for treating infected wounds. / Gabriel, Allen; Shores, Jaimie T; Heinrich, Cherrie; Baqai, Waheed; Kalina, Sharon; Sogioka, Norman; Gupta, Subhas.

In: International Wound Journal, Vol. 5, No. 3, 06.2008, p. 399-413.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gabriel, Allen ; Shores, Jaimie T ; Heinrich, Cherrie ; Baqai, Waheed ; Kalina, Sharon ; Sogioka, Norman ; Gupta, Subhas. / Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation : A pilot study describing a new method for treating infected wounds. In: International Wound Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 399-413.
@article{ad3934c4c1e04884a5c5da2f9637481a,
title = "Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation: A pilot study describing a new method for treating infected wounds",
abstract = "This data review reports the results of 15 patients who were treated with Vacuum-Assisted Closure{\circledR} (VAC) negative pressure therapy system in addition to the timed, intermittent delivery of an instilled topical solution for management of their complex, infected wounds. Prospective data for 15 patients treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)-instillation was recorded and analysed. Primary endpoints were compared to a retrospective control group of 15 patients treated with our institution's standard moist wound-care therapy. Culture-specific systemic antibiotics were prescribed as per specific patient need in both groups. All data were checked for normality of distribution and equality of variance and appropriate parametric and non parametric analyses were conducted. Compared with the standard moist wound-care therapy control group, patients in the NPWT-instillation group required fewer days of treatment (36.5 ± 13.1 versus 9.9 ± 4.3 days, P <0.001), cleared of clinical infection earlier (25.9 ± 6.6 versus 6.0 ± 1.5 days, P <0.001), had wounds close earlier (29.6 ± 6.5 versus 13.2 ± 6.8 days, P <0.001) and had fewer in-hospital stay days (39.2 ± 12.1 versus 14.7 ± 9.2 days, P <0.001). In this pilot study, NPWT instillation showed a significant decrease in the mean time to bioburden reduction, wound closure and hospital discharge compared with traditional wet-to-moist wound care. Outcomes from this study analysis suggest that the use of NPWT instillation may reduce cost and decrease inpatient care requirements for these complex, infected wounds.",
keywords = "Instillation, Negative pressure wound therapy, Silver nitrate, Vacuum-assisted closure therapy, Wound-care infection",
author = "Allen Gabriel and Shores, {Jaimie T} and Cherrie Heinrich and Waheed Baqai and Sharon Kalina and Norman Sogioka and Subhas Gupta",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1111/j.1742-481X.2007.00423.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "399--413",
journal = "International Wound Journal",
issn = "1742-4801",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation

T2 - A pilot study describing a new method for treating infected wounds

AU - Gabriel, Allen

AU - Shores, Jaimie T

AU - Heinrich, Cherrie

AU - Baqai, Waheed

AU - Kalina, Sharon

AU - Sogioka, Norman

AU - Gupta, Subhas

PY - 2008/6

Y1 - 2008/6

N2 - This data review reports the results of 15 patients who were treated with Vacuum-Assisted Closure® (VAC) negative pressure therapy system in addition to the timed, intermittent delivery of an instilled topical solution for management of their complex, infected wounds. Prospective data for 15 patients treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)-instillation was recorded and analysed. Primary endpoints were compared to a retrospective control group of 15 patients treated with our institution's standard moist wound-care therapy. Culture-specific systemic antibiotics were prescribed as per specific patient need in both groups. All data were checked for normality of distribution and equality of variance and appropriate parametric and non parametric analyses were conducted. Compared with the standard moist wound-care therapy control group, patients in the NPWT-instillation group required fewer days of treatment (36.5 ± 13.1 versus 9.9 ± 4.3 days, P <0.001), cleared of clinical infection earlier (25.9 ± 6.6 versus 6.0 ± 1.5 days, P <0.001), had wounds close earlier (29.6 ± 6.5 versus 13.2 ± 6.8 days, P <0.001) and had fewer in-hospital stay days (39.2 ± 12.1 versus 14.7 ± 9.2 days, P <0.001). In this pilot study, NPWT instillation showed a significant decrease in the mean time to bioburden reduction, wound closure and hospital discharge compared with traditional wet-to-moist wound care. Outcomes from this study analysis suggest that the use of NPWT instillation may reduce cost and decrease inpatient care requirements for these complex, infected wounds.

AB - This data review reports the results of 15 patients who were treated with Vacuum-Assisted Closure® (VAC) negative pressure therapy system in addition to the timed, intermittent delivery of an instilled topical solution for management of their complex, infected wounds. Prospective data for 15 patients treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)-instillation was recorded and analysed. Primary endpoints were compared to a retrospective control group of 15 patients treated with our institution's standard moist wound-care therapy. Culture-specific systemic antibiotics were prescribed as per specific patient need in both groups. All data were checked for normality of distribution and equality of variance and appropriate parametric and non parametric analyses were conducted. Compared with the standard moist wound-care therapy control group, patients in the NPWT-instillation group required fewer days of treatment (36.5 ± 13.1 versus 9.9 ± 4.3 days, P <0.001), cleared of clinical infection earlier (25.9 ± 6.6 versus 6.0 ± 1.5 days, P <0.001), had wounds close earlier (29.6 ± 6.5 versus 13.2 ± 6.8 days, P <0.001) and had fewer in-hospital stay days (39.2 ± 12.1 versus 14.7 ± 9.2 days, P <0.001). In this pilot study, NPWT instillation showed a significant decrease in the mean time to bioburden reduction, wound closure and hospital discharge compared with traditional wet-to-moist wound care. Outcomes from this study analysis suggest that the use of NPWT instillation may reduce cost and decrease inpatient care requirements for these complex, infected wounds.

KW - Instillation

KW - Negative pressure wound therapy

KW - Silver nitrate

KW - Vacuum-assisted closure therapy

KW - Wound-care infection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=45749134559&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=45749134559&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1742-481X.2007.00423.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1742-481X.2007.00423.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 18593390

AN - SCOPUS:45749134559

VL - 5

SP - 399

EP - 413

JO - International Wound Journal

JF - International Wound Journal

SN - 1742-4801

IS - 3

ER -