National Immunization Day: A strategy to monitor health and nutrition indicators

Leonor Maria Pacheco Santos, Rômulo Paes-Sousa, Jarbas Barbosa Da Silva, César Gomes Victora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Problem: To achieve the Millennium Development Goals it is necessary to set up low-cost, real-time monitoring systems which can provide feedback to managers and policy-makers in a timely fashion. The gold-standard approach for monitoring nutritional situations is to conduct household surveys. However, they are costly, time consuming and do not furnish information about smaller disaggregated units. Approach: Brazil pioneered National Immunization Days (NIDs) in the 1980s, and later integrated them with vitamin A supplementation. This report discusses implementation of five large-scale Health and Nutrition Days (HNDs) using NIDs as a platform to monitor nutritional status and estimate coverage of health and social welfare services, including conditional cash transfer benefits. Local setting: Brazil is composed of 26 states, one federal district and 5564 municipalities, with around 18 million children under five years of age. It was decided that HNDs would be carried out among high-risk populations: children from the semi-arid northeastern region; agrarian reform settlements; isolated rural black communities or quilombolas and municipalities of Amazonas state. Relevant changes: It was possible to draw inferences for almost 3 million children from different subgroups of underprivileged populations who had never before been studied in such detail, including state-level data. Lessons learned: Implementation of large scale HNDs in conjunction with NIDs proved to be feasible in Brazil and resulted in data which are very relevant for policy-makers, obtained over a short period of time and at reasonably low cost. It is sensible to conclude that the experience reported here could be reproduced wherever NID coverage is very high.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-479
Number of pages6
JournalBulletin of the World Health Organization
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Immunization
Brazil
Health
Administrative Personnel
Amazona
Costs and Cost Analysis
Social Welfare
Computer Systems
Rural Population
Nutritional Status
Social Work
Vitamin A
Gold
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

National Immunization Day : A strategy to monitor health and nutrition indicators. / Santos, Leonor Maria Pacheco; Paes-Sousa, Rômulo; Da Silva, Jarbas Barbosa; Victora, César Gomes.

In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol. 86, No. 6, 06.2008, p. 474-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Santos, Leonor Maria Pacheco ; Paes-Sousa, Rômulo ; Da Silva, Jarbas Barbosa ; Victora, César Gomes. / National Immunization Day : A strategy to monitor health and nutrition indicators. In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2008 ; Vol. 86, No. 6. pp. 474-479.
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