Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes among children in India prior to the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines: A cross-sectional study

Catherine G. Sutcliffe, Anita Shet, Rosemol Varghese, Balaji Veeraraghavan, Anand Manoharan, Brian Wahl, Sara Chandy, Jack Sternal, Raziuddin Khan, Rakesh Kumar Singh, Mathuram Santosham, Narendra K. Arora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia, meningitis, and other serious infections among children in India. India introduced the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in several states in 2017, and is expected to expand to nationwide coverage in the near future. To establish a baseline for measuring the impact of PCV in India, we assessed overall and serotype-specific nasopharyngeal carriage in two pediatric populations. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Palwal District, Haryana, from December 2016 to July 2017, prior to vaccine introduction. Children 2-59 months of age with clinical pneumonia seeking healthcare and those in the community with no clear illness were targeted for enrollment. A nasopharyngeal swab was collected and tested for pneumococcus using conventional culture and sequential multiplex PCR. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial resistance using an E test. Children were considered colonized if pneumococcus was isolated by culture or PCR. The prevalence of pneumococcal and serotype-specific colonization was compared between groups of children using log-binomial regression. Results: Among 601 children enrolled, 91 had clinical pneumonia and 510 were community children. The proportion colonized with S. pneumoniae was 74.7 and 54.5% among children with clinical pneumonia and community children, respectively (adjusted prevalence ratio: 1.38; 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 1.60). The prevalence of PCV13 vaccine-type colonization was similar between children with clinical pneumonia (31.9%) and community children (28.0%; p = 0.46). The most common colonizing serotypes were 6A, 6B, 14, 19A, 19F, and 23F, all of which are included in the PCV13 vaccine product. Antimicrobial resistance to at least one drug was similar between isolates from children with clinical pneumonia (66.1%) and community children (61.5%; p = 0.49); while resistance to at least two drugs was more common among isolates from children with clinical pneumonia (25.8% vs. 16.4%; p = 0.08). Resistance for all drugs was consistently higher for PCV13 vaccine-type serotypes compared to non-vaccine serotypes in both groups. Conclusion: This study provides baseline information on the prevalence of serotype-specific pneumococcal colonization among children prior to the introduction of PCV in India. Our results suggest a role for pneumococcal vaccines in reducing pneumococcal colonization and antimicrobial resistant isolates circulating in India.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number605
JournalBMC infectious diseases
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 10 2019

Keywords

  • India
  • Nasopharyngeal colonization
  • Pediatrics
  • Pneumococcus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

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