Napping Characteristics and Restricted Participation in Valued Activities among Older Adults

Jocelynn T. Owusu, Christine M. Ramsey, Marian Tzuang, Christopher N. Kaufmann, Jeanine M. Parisi, Adam P. Spira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Napping is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes among older adults. However, the association between particular napping characteristics (eg, frequency, duration, and whether naps were intentional) and daytime function is unclear. Methods Participants were 2,739 community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years from the nationally representative National Health and Aging Trends Study. Participants reported napping frequency, duration, and whether naps were intentional versus unintentional. Restricted participation in valued activities was measured by self-report. Results After adjusting for potential confounders and nighttime sleep duration, those who took intentional and unintentional naps had a greater odds of any valued activity restriction (ie, ≥1 valued activity restriction), compared to those who rarely/never napped (unintentional odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.79, intentional OR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.09, 2.04). There was no difference between unintentional napping and intentional napping with respect to any valued activity restriction after adjustment for demographics. Compared to participants napping "some days," those napping most days/every day had a greater odds of any valued activity restriction (OR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.30, 2.16). Moreover, each 30-minute increase in average nap duration was associated with a 25% greater odds of any valued activity restriction (OR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.10, 1.43). Conclusion Older adults who took more frequent or longer naps were more likely to report activity restrictions, as were those who took intentional or unintentional naps. Additional longitudinal studies with objective measures of sleep are needed to further our understanding of associations between napping characteristics and daytime dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-373
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2 2018

Keywords

  • Function
  • Health status
  • Sleep
  • Social participation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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