Na+, K+-ATPase and heart excitability

D. Lichtstein, A. Shainberg, J. Solarao, E. Marban, H. E D J Ter Keurs, M. Morad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Na+, K+-activated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) is present in the membrane of eukaryotic cells and represent a major pathway for Na+ and K+ transport across the plasma membrane. Cardiac glycosides, such as digoxin or ouabain, inhibit this enzyme activity by binding to a specific receptor on the membrane. Studies conducted in this and other laboratories have proven the existence of digitalis-like compounds in animal and human tissues which may serve as regulators, in vivo, of the Na+, K+-pump activity. The levels of digitalis-like compounds in the plasma are increased in hypertension and other illnesses. A possible link at the cellular and molecular level between these compounds and etiology of arrhythmias, an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with various diseases of the heart, can be postulated: Na+, K+-ATPase activity contributes directly and indirectly to the electrical membrane potential of cardiac cells. The inhibition of this pump by the endogenous digitalis-like compounds, in discrete areas of the heart, can induCe changes of the membrane potential of these cells. These changes may cause an increase in excitability of the particular cells and contribute to the generation of arrhythmias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-30
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume382
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Digitalis
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Membranes
Membrane Potentials
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Cardiac Glycosides
Digoxin
Pumps
Eukaryotic Cells
Ouabain
Heart Diseases
Enzyme activity
Cell membranes
Cell Membrane
Hypertension
Morbidity
Animals
Mortality
Enzymes
Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Lichtstein, D., Shainberg, A., Solarao, J., Marban, E., Ter Keurs, H. E. D. J., & Morad, M. (1995). Na+, K+-ATPase and heart excitability. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 382, 23-30.

Na+, K+-ATPase and heart excitability. / Lichtstein, D.; Shainberg, A.; Solarao, J.; Marban, E.; Ter Keurs, H. E D J; Morad, M.

In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, Vol. 382, 1995, p. 23-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lichtstein, D, Shainberg, A, Solarao, J, Marban, E, Ter Keurs, HEDJ & Morad, M 1995, 'Na+, K+-ATPase and heart excitability', Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 382, pp. 23-30.
Lichtstein D, Shainberg A, Solarao J, Marban E, Ter Keurs HEDJ, Morad M. Na+, K+-ATPase and heart excitability. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. 1995;382:23-30.
Lichtstein, D. ; Shainberg, A. ; Solarao, J. ; Marban, E. ; Ter Keurs, H. E D J ; Morad, M. / Na+, K+-ATPase and heart excitability. In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. 1995 ; Vol. 382. pp. 23-30.
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