N-linked glycosylation of rabies virus glycoprotein. Individual sequons differ in their glycosylation efficiencies and influence on cell surface expression

S. H. Shakin-Eshleman, A. T. Remaley, J. R. Eshleman, W. H. Wunner, S. L. Spitalnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by N-linked glycosylation, a process in which oligosaccharides are added to asparagine residues in the sequon Asn- X-Ser/Thr. However, not all such sequons are glycosylated. For example, rabies virus glycoprotein (RGP) contains three sequons, only two of which appear to be glycosylated in virions. To examine further the signals in proteins which regulate N-linked core glycosylation, the glycosylation efficiencies of each of the three sequons in the antigenic domain of RGP were compared. For these studies, mutants were generated in which one or more sequons were deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. Core glycosylation of these mutants was studied using two independent systems: 1) in vitro translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysate supplemented with dog pancreatic microsomes, and 2) transfection into glycosylation-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. Parallel results were obtained with both systems, demonstrating that the sequon at Asn37 is inefficiently glycosylated, the sequons at Asn247 and Asn319 are efficiently glycosylated, and the glycosylation efficiency of each sequon is not influenced by glycosylation at other sequons in this protein. High levels of cell surface expression of RGP in Chinese hamster ovary cells are seen with any mutant containing an intact sequon at Asn247 or Asn319, whereas low levels of cell surface expression are seen when the sequon at Asn37 is present alone; deletion of all three sequons completely blocks RGP cell surface expression. Thus, although core glycosylation at Asn37 is inefficient, it is still sufficient to support a biological function, cell surface expression. Future studies using mutagenesis of this model protein and its expression in these two well defined systems will aim to begin to unravel the rules governing core glycosylation of glycoproteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10690-10698
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume267
Issue number15
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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