Myths and fallacies about epilepsy among residents of a Karachi slum area

Majid Shafiq, Mansoor Tanwir, Asma Tariq, Ayesha Saleem, Monaa Zafar, Ali Khan Khuwaja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Misconceptions about epilepsy may explain the considerable stigma accompanying it. We aimed to identify such fallacies through questionnaire-based interviews of 487 adult residents of a slum area in Karachi, Pakistan. Of those interviewed, 25% believed that epilepsy was caused by evil spirits, black magic and envy by others - those without a school education were more likely to hold these views (P <0.05). Perceived complications included impotence and cancer. Shoe-sniffing was considered a treatment modality by 13%. It appears that misconceptions abound regarding epilepsy's causes, complications and methods of treatment. However, those who had received a school education were less likely to link epilepsy with supernatural phenomena.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-33
Number of pages2
JournalTropical Doctor
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Poverty Areas
Epilepsy
Education
Magic
Shoes
Pakistan
Erectile Dysfunction
Interviews
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Shafiq, M., Tanwir, M., Tariq, A., Saleem, A., Zafar, M., & Khuwaja, A. K. (2008). Myths and fallacies about epilepsy among residents of a Karachi slum area. Tropical Doctor, 38(1), 32-33. https://doi.org/10.1258/td.2006.006311

Myths and fallacies about epilepsy among residents of a Karachi slum area. / Shafiq, Majid; Tanwir, Mansoor; Tariq, Asma; Saleem, Ayesha; Zafar, Monaa; Khuwaja, Ali Khan.

In: Tropical Doctor, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 32-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shafiq, M, Tanwir, M, Tariq, A, Saleem, A, Zafar, M & Khuwaja, AK 2008, 'Myths and fallacies about epilepsy among residents of a Karachi slum area', Tropical Doctor, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 32-33. https://doi.org/10.1258/td.2006.006311
Shafiq M, Tanwir M, Tariq A, Saleem A, Zafar M, Khuwaja AK. Myths and fallacies about epilepsy among residents of a Karachi slum area. Tropical Doctor. 2008 Jan;38(1):32-33. https://doi.org/10.1258/td.2006.006311
Shafiq, Majid ; Tanwir, Mansoor ; Tariq, Asma ; Saleem, Ayesha ; Zafar, Monaa ; Khuwaja, Ali Khan. / Myths and fallacies about epilepsy among residents of a Karachi slum area. In: Tropical Doctor. 2008 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 32-33.
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