Mycoplasma genitalium and Trichomonas vaginalis: addressing disparities and promoting public health control of two emerging sexually transmitted infections

Faye Korich, Neha G. Reddy, Maria Trent

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Mycoplasma genitalium (M. genitalium) and Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis), sexually transmitted infections that remain non-reportable in the United States, may lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and adverse pregnancy outcomes if left untreated. Prevalence estimates have highlighted socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in rates of infection. This review summarizes the recent literature on M. genitalium and T. vaginalis with a focus on the epidemiology, screening, and treatment of M. genitalium and T. vaginalis. RECENT FINDINGS: The burden of T. vaginalis testing remains on women. Antimicrobial resistance is of great concern for M. genitalium. Comprehensive screening and treatment guidelines present an opportunity to address these public health concerns. SUMMARY: M. genitalium and T. vaginalis infections disproportionately affect sexual and racial/ethnic minorities and those facing socioeconomic disparities. The availability of nucleic acid amplification test testing has facilitated accurate diagnosis of both disorders. Safe and efficacious treatments are available for treatment of both disorders. Integrating macrolide resistance testing into treatment algorithms for M. genitalium and dual antibiotic therapy may prove a useful strategy for future US-based guidance. Public health reporting and increased public awareness campaigns are key next steps to addressing the observed reproductive health disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-488
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent opinion in pediatrics
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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