Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections

Shelley S. Magill, Jonathan R. Edwards, Wendy Bamberg, Zintars G. Beldavs, Ghinwa Dumyati, Marion A. Kainer, Ruth Lynfield, Meghan Maloney, Laura McAllister-Hollod, Joelle Nadle, Susan M. Ray, Deborah L. Thompson, Lucy E. Wilson, Scott K. Fridkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Currently, no single U.S. surveillance system can provide estimates of the burden of all types of health care-associated infections across acute care patient populations. We conducted a prevalence survey in 10 geographically diverse states to determine the prevalence of health care-associated infections in acute care hospitals and generate updated estimates of the national burden of such infections. METHODS: We defined health care-associated infections with the use of National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One-day surveys of randomly selected inpatients were performed in participating hospitals. Hospital personnel collected demographic and limited clinical data. Trained data collectors reviewed medical records retrospectively to identify health care-associated infections active at the time of the survey. Survey data and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample data, stratified according to patient age and length of hospital stay, were used to estimate the total numbers of health care-associated infections and of inpatients with such infections in U.S. acute care hospitals in 2011. RESULTS: Surveys were conducted in 183 hospitals. Of 11,282 patients, 452 had 1 or more health care-associated infections (4.0%; 95% confidence interval, 3.7 to 4.4). Of 504 such infections, the most common types were pneumonia (21.8%), surgical-site infections (21.8%), and gastrointestinal infections (17.1%). Clostridium difficile was the most commonly reported pathogen (causing 12.1% of health care-associated infections). Device-associated infections (i.e., central-catheter-associated bloodstream infection, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and ventilator- associated pneumonia), which have traditionally been the focus of programs to prevent health care-associated infections, accounted for 25.6% of such infections. We estimated that there were 648,000 patients with 721,800 health care-associated infections in U.S. acute care hospitals in 2011. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this multistate prevalence survey of health care-associated infections indicate that public health surveillance and prevention activities should continue to address C. difficile infections. As device- and procedure-associated infections decrease, consideration should be given to expanding surveillance and prevention activities to include other health care-associated infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1198-1208
Number of pages11
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume370
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Cross Infection
Infection
Inpatients
Catheter-Related Infections
Clostridium difficile
Length of Stay
Surveys and Questionnaires
Public Health Surveillance
Hospital Personnel
Clostridium Infections
Surgical Wound Infection
Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia
Equipment and Supplies
Urinary Tract Infections
Medical Records
Pneumonia
Patient Care
Demography
Confidence Intervals
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Magill, S. S., Edwards, J. R., Bamberg, W., Beldavs, Z. G., Dumyati, G., Kainer, M. A., ... Fridkin, S. K. (2014). Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections. New England Journal of Medicine, 370(13), 1198-1208. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1306801

Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections. / Magill, Shelley S.; Edwards, Jonathan R.; Bamberg, Wendy; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Kainer, Marion A.; Lynfield, Ruth; Maloney, Meghan; McAllister-Hollod, Laura; Nadle, Joelle; Ray, Susan M.; Thompson, Deborah L.; Wilson, Lucy E.; Fridkin, Scott K.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 370, No. 13, 2014, p. 1198-1208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Magill, SS, Edwards, JR, Bamberg, W, Beldavs, ZG, Dumyati, G, Kainer, MA, Lynfield, R, Maloney, M, McAllister-Hollod, L, Nadle, J, Ray, SM, Thompson, DL, Wilson, LE & Fridkin, SK 2014, 'Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 370, no. 13, pp. 1198-1208. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1306801
Magill SS, Edwards JR, Bamberg W, Beldavs ZG, Dumyati G, Kainer MA et al. Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections. New England Journal of Medicine. 2014;370(13):1198-1208. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1306801
Magill, Shelley S. ; Edwards, Jonathan R. ; Bamberg, Wendy ; Beldavs, Zintars G. ; Dumyati, Ghinwa ; Kainer, Marion A. ; Lynfield, Ruth ; Maloney, Meghan ; McAllister-Hollod, Laura ; Nadle, Joelle ; Ray, Susan M. ; Thompson, Deborah L. ; Wilson, Lucy E. ; Fridkin, Scott K. / Multistate point-prevalence survey of health care-associated infections. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 370, No. 13. pp. 1198-1208.
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AU - Dumyati, Ghinwa

AU - Kainer, Marion A.

AU - Lynfield, Ruth

AU - Maloney, Meghan

AU - McAllister-Hollod, Laura

AU - Nadle, Joelle

AU - Ray, Susan M.

AU - Thompson, Deborah L.

AU - Wilson, Lucy E.

AU - Fridkin, Scott K.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Currently, no single U.S. surveillance system can provide estimates of the burden of all types of health care-associated infections across acute care patient populations. We conducted a prevalence survey in 10 geographically diverse states to determine the prevalence of health care-associated infections in acute care hospitals and generate updated estimates of the national burden of such infections. METHODS: We defined health care-associated infections with the use of National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One-day surveys of randomly selected inpatients were performed in participating hospitals. Hospital personnel collected demographic and limited clinical data. Trained data collectors reviewed medical records retrospectively to identify health care-associated infections active at the time of the survey. Survey data and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample data, stratified according to patient age and length of hospital stay, were used to estimate the total numbers of health care-associated infections and of inpatients with such infections in U.S. acute care hospitals in 2011. RESULTS: Surveys were conducted in 183 hospitals. Of 11,282 patients, 452 had 1 or more health care-associated infections (4.0%; 95% confidence interval, 3.7 to 4.4). Of 504 such infections, the most common types were pneumonia (21.8%), surgical-site infections (21.8%), and gastrointestinal infections (17.1%). Clostridium difficile was the most commonly reported pathogen (causing 12.1% of health care-associated infections). Device-associated infections (i.e., central-catheter-associated bloodstream infection, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and ventilator- associated pneumonia), which have traditionally been the focus of programs to prevent health care-associated infections, accounted for 25.6% of such infections. We estimated that there were 648,000 patients with 721,800 health care-associated infections in U.S. acute care hospitals in 2011. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this multistate prevalence survey of health care-associated infections indicate that public health surveillance and prevention activities should continue to address C. difficile infections. As device- and procedure-associated infections decrease, consideration should be given to expanding surveillance and prevention activities to include other health care-associated infections.

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